OpenStack Vancouver six observations: partners, metal, tents, defore, brands & breakage

As always, OpenStack conferences/summits are packed with talks and discussions.  Any one of these six points could be a full post; however, I would rather post now and start discussions.  Let me know what you think!

1. Partnering Everywhere – it’s froth, not milk

Everyone is partnering with everyone! It’s a good way to appear to cover more around and appear more open. Right now, I believe these partnerships are for show and very shallow. There will be blood when money is flowing and both partners want the lion’s share.

2. Metal is Hot! attention on Ironic & MaaS

Metal is very hot topic. No surprise, but I do not think that either MaaS or Ironic have the right architecture to deal with the real complexity of automating metal in a generalized way. The consequence is that they are limited and hard to operate.

Container talks were also very hot and I believe are ultimately disruptive.  The very fact that all the container talks were overflowing is an indication of the challenges facing virtualization.

3. DefCore – Just in the Nick of Time

I think that the press and analysts were ready to proclaim that OpenStack was fragmenting and being unable to deliver the “one cloud, multiple vendors” vision. DefCore (presented as Interopability by Jonathan Bryce, DefCore shout out!) came in on the buzzer to buy us more time.

4. Big Tent Concerns – what is ecosystem & release?

Big Tent is shorthand for project governance changes that make it easier for new projects to become OpenStack projects and removes the concept of integrated releases.  The exact definition is still a work in progress.

The top concerns I have are:

  1. We cannot tell difference between community & ecosystem. We’re back to anointed projects because we’re now telling projects they have to join OpenStack to work with OpenStack.
  2. We’re changing the definition of the release but have not defined how it will change. I acknowledge that continuous release is ideal but we’re confusing people again.

5. Brands are battling – will they destroy the city?

OpenStack is hard for startups – I’m working on a full post for next week.  The short version is that big companies are taking up all the air.

While some are leading, others they are learning how to collaborate.  Those new to open source are slow to trust and uncertain about where to invest.  Unfortunately, we’ve created a visible contributions economy that does not reward doing the scut work so it’s no surprise that there are concerns that some of the bigger companies are free riding.

6. OpenStack is broken talks – could we reboot?  no.

It’s a sign of OpenStack’s age that Bias, Termie and others suggested we need clean slate.  Frankly, I think that OpenStack would be irrelevant by the time a rewrite was completed and it not helpful to suggest it.

What would I suggest?  I’d promote a strong core (doing!), ensure big companies collaborate on roadmap (doing!) and stop having a single node install as gate and dev reference (I’d happily help use OCB for this with partners)

PS: Apparently Neutron is not broken.

I’m very excited about the “just give me a network” work to make Neutron duplicate Nova-Net functionality.  Finally.

Docker-Machine Crowbar Driver Delivers Metal Containers

I’ve just completed a basic Docker Machine driver for OpenCrowbar.  This enables you to quickly spin-up (and down) remote Docker hosts on bare metal servers from their command line tool.  There are significant cost, simplicity and performance advantages for this approach if you were already planning to dedicate servers to container workloads.

Docker Machine

The basics are pretty simple: using Docker Machine CLI you can “create” and “rm” new Docker hosts on bare metal using the crowbar driver.  Since we’re talking about metal, “create” is really “assign a machine from an available pool.”

Behind the scenes Crowbar is doing a full provision cycle of the system including installing the operating system and injecting the user keys.  Crowbar’s design would allow operators to automatically inject additional steps, add monitoring agents and security, to the provisioning process without changing the driver operation.

Beyond Create, the driver supports the other Machine verbs like remove, stop, start, ssh and inspect.  In the case of remove, the Machine is cleaned up and put back in the pool for the next user [note: work remains on the full remove>recreate process].

Overall, this driver allows Docker Machine to work transparently against metal infrastructure along side whatever cloud services you also choose.

Want to try it out?

  1. You need to setup OpenCrowbar – if you follow the defaults (192.168.124.10 ip, user, password) then the Docker Machine driver defaults will also work. Also, make sure you have the Ubuntu 14.04 ISO available for the Crowbar provisioner
  2. Discover some nodes in Crowbar – you do NOT need metal servers to try this, the tests work fine with virtual machines (tools/kvm-slave &)
  3. Clone my Machine repo (Wde’re looking for feedback before a pull to Docker/Machine)
  4. Compile the code using script/build.
  5. Allocate a Docker Node using  ./docker-machine create –driver crowbar testme
  6. Go to the Crowbar UI to watch the node be provisioned and configured into the Docker-Machines pool
  7. Release the node using ./docker-machine rm testme
  8. Go to the Crowbar UI to watch the node be redeployed back to the System pool
  9. Try to contain your enthusiasm :)

As CloudFoundry Builds Ecosystem and Utility, What Challenges Arise? (observations from CFSummit)

I’ve been on the outskirts of the CloudFoundry (CF) universe from the dawn of the project (it’s a little remembered fact that there was a 2011 Crowbar install of CloudFoundry.

openProgress and investment have been substantial and, happily, organic. Like many platforms, it’s success relies on a reasonable balance between strong opinions about “right” patterns and enough flexibility to accommodate exceptions.

From a well patterned foundation, development teams find acceleration.  This seems to be helping CloudFoundry win some high-profile enterprise adopters.

The interesting challenge ahead of the project comes from building more complex autonomous deployments. With the challenge of horizontal scale of arguably behind them, CF users are starting to build more complex architectures.  This includes dynamic provisioning of the providers (like data bases, object stores and other persistent adjacent services) and connecting to containerized “micro-services.”  (see Matt Stine’s preso)

While this is a natural evolution, it adds an order of magnitude more complexity because the contracts between previously isolated layers are suddenly not reliable.

For example, what happens to a CF deployment when the database provider is field upgraded to a new version.  That could introduce breaking changes in dependent applications that are completely opaque to the data provider.  These are hard problems to solve.

Happily, that’s exactly the discussions that we’re starting to have with container orchestration systems.  It’s also part of the dialog that I’ve been trying to drive with Functional Operations (FuncOps Preso) on the physical automation side.  I’m optimistic that CloudFoundry patterns will help make this problem more tractable.

Are VMs becoming El Caminos? Containers & Metal provide new choices for DevOps

I released “VMS ARE DEAD” this post two weeks ago on DevOps.com.  My point here is that Ops Automation (aka DevOps) is FINALLY growing beyond Cloud APIs and VMs.  This creates a much richer ecosystem of deployment targets instead of having to shoehorn every workload into the same platform.

In 2010, it looked as if visualization had won. We expected all servers to virtualize workloads and the primary question was which cloud infrastructure manager would dominate. Now in 2015, the picture is not as clear. I’m seeing a trend that threatens the “virtualize all things” battle cry.

IMG_20150301_170558985Really, it’s two intersecting trends: metal is getting cheaper and easier while container orchestration is advancing on rockets. If metal can truck around the heavy stable workloads while containers zip around like sports cars, that leaves VMs as a strange hybrid in the middle.

What’s the middle? It’s the El Camino, that notorious discontinued half car, half pick-up truck.

The explosion of interest in containerized workloads (I know, they’ve been around for a long time but Docker made them sexy somehow) has been creating secondary wave of container orchestration. Five years ago, I called that Platform as a Service (PaaS) but this new generation looks more like a CI/CD pipeline plus DevOps platform than our original PaaS concepts. These emerging pipelines obfuscate the operational environment differently than virtualized infrastructure (let’s call it IaaS). The platforms do not care about servers or application tiers, their semantic is about connecting services together. It’s a different deployment paradigm that’s more about SOA than resource reservation.

On the other side, we’ve been working hard to make physical ops more automated using the same DevOps tool chains. To complicate matters, the physics of silicon has meant that we’ve gone from scale up to scale out. Modern applications are so massive that they are going to exceed any single system so economics drives us to lots and lots of small, inexpensive servers. If you factor in the operational complexity and cost of hypervisors/clouds, an small actual dedicated server is a cost-effective substitute for a comparable virtual machine.

I’ll repeat that: a small dedicated server is a cost-effective substitute for a comparable virtual machine.

I am not speaking against virtualize servers or clouds. They have a critical role in data center operations; however, I hear from operators who are rethinking the idea that all servers will be virtualized and moving towards a more heterogeneous view of their data center. Once where they have a fleet of trucks, sports cars and El Caminos.

Of course, I’d be disingenuous if I neglected to point out that trucks are used to transport cars too. At some point, everything is metal.

Want more metal friendly reading?  See Packet CEO Zac Smith’s thinking on this topic.

Art Fewell and I discuss DevOps, SDN, Containers & OpenStack [video + transcript]

A little while back, Art Fewell and I had two excellent discussions about general trends and challenges in the cloud and scale data center space.  Due to technical difficulties, the first (funnier one) was lost forever to NSA archives, but the second survived!

The video and transcript were just posted to Network World as part of Art’s on going interview series.  It was an action packed hour so I don’t want to re-post the transcript here.  I thought selected quotes (under the video) were worth calling out to whet your appetite for the whole tamale.

My highlights:

  1. .. partnering with a start-up was really hard, but partnering with an open source project actually gave us a lot more influence and control.
  2. Then we got into OpenStack, … we [Dell] wanted to invest our time and that we could be part of and would be sustained and transparent to the community.
  3. Incumbents are starting to be threatened by these new opened technologies … that I think levels of playing field is having an open platform.
  4. …I was pointing at you and laughing… [you’ll have to see the video]
  5. docker and containerization … potentially is disruptive to OpenStack and how OpenStack is operating
  6. You have to turn the crank faster and faster and faster to keep up.
  7. Small things I love about OpenStack … vendors are learning how to work in these open communities. When they don’t do it right they’re told very strongly that they don’t.
  8. It was literally a Power Point of everything that was wrong … [I said,] “Yes, that’s true. You want to help?”
  9. …people aiming missiles at your house right now…
  10. With containers you can sell that same piece of hardware 10 times or more and really pack in the workloads and so you get better performance and over subscription and so the utilization of the infrastructure goes way up.
  11. I’m not as much of a believer in that OpenStack eats the data center phenomena.
  12. First thing is automate. I’ve talked to people a lot about getting ready for OpenStack and what they should do. The bottom line is before you even invest in these technologies, automating your workloads and deployments is a huge component for being successful with that.
  13. Now, all of sudden the SDN layer is connecting these network function virtualization ..  It’s a big mess. It’s really hard, it’s really complex.
  14. The thing that I’m really excited about is the service architecture. We’re in the middle of doing on the RackN and Crowbar side, we’re in the middle of doing an architecture that’s basically turning data center operations into services.
  15. What platform as a service really is about, it’s about how you store the information. What services do you offer around the elastic part? Elastic is time based, it’s where you’re manipulating in the data.
  16. RE RackN: You can’t manufacture infrastructure but you can use it in a much “cloudier way”. It really redefines what you can do in a datacenter.
  17. That abstraction layer means that people can work together and actually share scripts
  18. I definitely think that OpenStack’s legacy will more likely be the community and the governance and what we’ve learned from that than probably the code.

2015, the year cloud died. Meet the seven riders of the cloudocalypse

i can hazAfter writing pages of notes about the impact of Docker, microservice architectures, mainstreaming of Ops Automation, software defined networking, exponential data growth and the explosion of alternative hardware architecture, I realized that it all boils down to the death of cloud as we know it.

OK, we’re not killing cloud per se this year.  It’s more that we’ve put 10 pounds of cloud into a 5 pound bag so it’s just not working in 2015 to call it cloud.

Cloud was happily misunderstood back in 2012 as virtualized infrastructure wrapped in an API beside some platform services (like object storage).

That illusion will be shattered in 2015 as we fully digest the extent of the beautiful and complex mess that we’ve created in the search for better scale economics and faster delivery pipelines.  2015 is going to cause a lot of indigestion for CIOs, analysts and wandering technology executives.  No one can pick the winners with Decisive Leadership™ alone because there are simply too many possible right ways to solve problems.

Here’s my list of the seven cloud disrupting technologies and frameworks that will gain even greater momentum in 2015:

  1. Docker – I think that Docker is the face of a larger disruption around containers and packaging.  I’m sure Docker is not the thing alone.  There are a fleet of related technologies and Docker replacements; however, there’s no doubt that it’s leading a timely rethinking of application life-cycle delivery.
  2. New languages and frameworks – it’s not just the rapid maturity of Node.js and Go, but the frameworks and services that we’re building (like Cloud Foundry or Apache Spark) that change the way we use traditional languages.
  3. Microservice architectures – this is more than containers, it’s really Functional Programming for Ops (aka FuncOps) that’s a new generation of service oriented architecture that is being empowered by container orchestration systems (like Brooklyn or Fleet).  Using microservices well seems to redefine how we use traditional cloud.
  4. Mainstreaming of Ops Automation – We’re past “if DevOps” and into the how. Ops automation, not cloud, is the real puppies vs cattle battle ground.  As IT creates automation to better use clouds, we create application portability that makes cloud disappear.  This freedom translates into new choices (like PaaS, containers or hardware) for operators.
  5. Software defined networking – SDN means different things but the impacts are all the same: we are automating networking and integrating it into our deployments.  The days of networking and compute silos are ending and that’s going to change how we think about cloud and the supporting infrastructure.
  6. Exponential data growth – you cannot build applications or infrastructure without considering how your storage needs will grow as we absorb more data streams and internet of things sources.
  7. Explosion of alternative hardware architecture – In 2010, infrastructure was basically pizza box or blade from a handful of vendors.  Today, I’m seeing a rising tide of alternatives architectures including ARM, Converged and Storage focused from an increasing cadre of sources including vendors sharing open designs (OCP).  With improved automation, these new “non-cloud” options become part of the dynamic infrastructure spectrum.

Today these seven items create complexity and confusion as we work to balance the new concepts and technologies.  I can see a path forward that redefines IT to be both more flexible and dynamic while also being stable and performing.

Want more 2015 predictions?  Here’s my OpenStack EOY post about limiting/expanding the project scope.

4 item OSCON report: no buzz winner, OpenStack is DownStack?, Free vs Open & the upstream imperative

Now that my PDX Trimet pass expired, it’s time to reflect on OSCON 2014.   Unfortunately, I did not ride my unicorn home on a rainbow; this year’s event seemed to be about raising red flags.

My four key observations:

  1. No superstar. Past OSCONs had at least one buzzy community super star.  2013 was Docker and 2011 was OpenStack.  This was not just my hallway track perception, I asked around about this specifically.  There was no buzz winner in 2014.
  2. People were down on OpenStack (“DownStack”). Yes, we did have a dedicated “Open Cloud Day” event but there was something missing.  OpenSack did not sponsor and there were no major parties or releases (compared to previous years) and little OpenStack buzz.  Many people I talked to were worried about the direction of the community, fragmentation of the project and operational readiness.  I would be more concerned about “DownStack” except that no open infrastructure was a superstar either (e.g.: Mesos, Kubernetes and CoreOS).  Perhaps, OSCON is simply not a good venue open infrastructure projects compared to GlueCon or Velocity?  Considering the rapid raise of container-friendly OpenStack alternatives; I think the answer may be that the battle lines for open infrastructure are being redrawn.
  3. Free vs. Open. Perhaps my perspective is more nuanced now (many in open source communities don’t distinguish between Free and Open source) but there’s a real tension between Free (do what you want) and Open (shared but governed) source.  Now that open source is a commercial darling, there is a lot of grumbling in the Free community about corporate influence and heavy handedness.   I suspect this will get louder as companies try to find ways to maintain control of their projects.
  4. Corporate upstreaming becomes Imperative. There’s an accelerating upstreaming trend for companies that write lots of code to support their primary business (Google is a primary example) to ensure that code becomes used outside their company.   They open their code and start efforts to ensure its adoption.  This requires a dedicated post to really explain.

There’s a clear theme here: Open source is going mainstream corporate.

We’ve been building amazing software in the open that create real value for companies.  Much of that value has been created organically by well-intentioned individuals; unfortunately, that model will not scale with the arrival for corporate interests.

Open source is thriving not dying: these companies value the transparency, collaboration and innovation of open development.  Instead, open source is transforming to fit within corporate investment and governance needs.  It’s our job to help with that metamorphosis.