To thrive, OpenStack must better balance dev, ops and business needs.

OpenStack has grown dramatically in many ways but we have failed to integrate development, operations and business communities in a balanced way.

My most urgent observation from Paris is that these three critical parts of the community are having vastly different dialogs about OpenStack.

Clouds DownAt the Conference, business people were talking were about core, stability and utility while the developers were talking about features, reorganizing and expanding projects. The operators, unfortunately segregated in a different location, were trying to figure out how to share best practices and tools.

Much of this structural divergence was intentional and should be (re)evaluated as we grow.

OpenStack events are split into distinct focus areas: the conference for business people, the summit for developers and specialized days for operators. While this design serves a purpose, the community needs to be taking extra steps to ensure communication. Without that communication, corporate sponsors and users may find it easier to solve problems inside their walls than outside in the community.

The risk is clear: vendors may find it easier to work on a fork where they have business and operational control than work within the community.

Inside the community, we are working to help resolve this challenge with several parallel efforts. As a community member, I challenge you to get involved in these efforts to ensure the project balances dev, biz and ops priorities.  As a board member, I feel it’s a leadership challenge to make sure these efforts converge and that’s one of the reasons I’ve been working on several of these efforts:

  • OpenStack Project Managers (was Hidden Influencers) across companies in the ecosystem are getting organized into their own team. Since these managers effectively direct the majority of OpenStack developers, this group will allow
  • DefCore Committee works to define a smaller subset of the overall OpenStack Project that will be required for vendors using the OpenStack trademark and logo. This helps the business community focus on interoperability and stability.
  • Technical leadership (TC) lead “Big Tent” concept aligns with DefCore work and attempts to create a stable base platform while making it easier for new projects to enter the ecosystem. I’ve got a lot to say about this, but frankly, without safeguards, this scares people in the ops and business communities.
  • An operations “ready state” baseline keeps the community from being able to share best practices – this has become a pressing need.  I’d like to suggest as OpenCrowbar an outside of OpenStack a way to help provide an ops neutral common starting point. Having the OpenStack developer community attempting to create an installer using OpenStack has proven a significant distraction and only further distances operators from the community.

We need to get past seeing the project primarily as a technology platform.  Infrastructure software has to deliver value as an operational tool for enterprises.  For OpenStack to thrive, we must make sure the needs of all constituents (Dev, Biz, Ops) are being addressed.

Self-Exposure: Hidden Influencers become OpenStack Product Working Group

Warning to OpenStack PMs: If you are not actively involved in this effort then you (and your teams) will be left behind!

ManagersThe Hidden Influencers (now called “OpenStack Product Working Group”) had a GREAT and PRODUCTIVE session at the OpenStack (full notes):

  1. Named the group!  OpenStack Product Working Group (now, that’s clarity in marketing) [note: I was incorrect saying “Product Managers” earlier].
  2. Agreed to use the mailing list for communication.
  3. Committed to a face-to-face mid-cycle meetup (likely in South Bay)
  4. Output from the meetup will be STRATEGIC DIRECTION doc to board (similar but broader than “Win the Enterprise”)
  5. Regular meeting schedule – like developers but likely voice interactive instead of IRC.  Stefano Maffulli is leading.

PMs starting this group already direct the work for a super majority (>66%) of active contributors.

The primary mission for the group is to collaborate and communicate around development priorities so that we can ensure that project commitments get met.

It was recognized that the project technical leads are already strapped coordinating release and technical objectives.  Further, the product managers are already but independently engaged in setting strategic direction, we cannot rely on existing OpenStack technical leadership to have the bandwidth.

This effort will succeed to the extent that we can help the broader community tied in and focus development effort back to dollars for the people paying for those developers.  In my book, that’s what product managers are supposed to do.  Hopefully, getting this group organized will help surface that discussion.

This is a big challenge considering that these product managers have to balance corporate, shared project and individual developers’ requirements.  Overall, I think Allison Randall summarized our objectives best: “we’re herding cats in the same direction.”

Leveling OpenStack’s Big Tent: is OpenStack a product, platform or suite?

Question of the day: What should OpenStack do with all those eager contributors?  Does that mean expanding features or focusing on a core?

IMG_20141108_101906In the last few months, the OpenStack technical leadership (Sean Dague, Monty Taylor) has been introducing two interconnected concepts: big tent and levels.

  • Big tent means expanding the number of projects to accommodate more diversity (both in breath and depth) in the official OpenStack universe.  This change accommodates the growth of the community.
  • Levels is a structured approach to limiting integration dependencies between projects.  Some OpenStack components are highly interdependent and foundational (Keystone, Nova, Glance, Cinder) while others are primarily consumers (Horizon, Saraha) of lower level projects.

These two concepts are connected because we must address integration challenges that make it increasingly difficult to make changes within the code base.  If we substantially expand the code base with big tent then we need to make matching changes to streamline integration efforts.  The levels proposal reflects a narrower scope at the base than we currently use.

By combining big tent and levels, we are simultaneously growing and shrinking: we grow the community and scope while we shrink the integration points.  This balance may be essential to accommodate OpenStack’s growth.

UNIVERSALLY, the business OpenStack community who wants OpenStack to be a product.  Yet, what’s included in that product is unclear.

Expanding OpenStack projects tends to turn us into a suite of loosely connected functions rather than a single integrated platform with an ecosystem.  Either approach is viable, but it’s not possible to be both simultaneously.

On a cautionary note, there’s an anti-Big Tent position I heard expressed at the Paris Conference.  It’s goes like this: until vendors start generating revenue from the foundation components to pay for developer salaries; expanding the scope of OpenStack is uninteresting.

Recent DefCore changes also reflect the Big Tent thinking by adding component and platform levels.  This change was an important and critical compromise to match real-world use patterns by companies like Swiftstack (Object), DreamHost (Compute+Ceph), Piston (Compute+Ceph) and others; however, it creates the need to explain “which OpenStack” these companies are using.

I believe we have addressed interoperability in this change.  It remains to be seen if OpenStack vendors will choose to offer the broader platform or limit to themselves to individual components.  If vendors chase the components over platform then OpenStack becomes a suite of loosely connect products.  It’s ultimately a customer and market decision.

It’s not too late to influence these discussions!  I’m very interested in hearing from people in the community which direction they think the project should go.

Unicorn captured! Unpacking multi-node OpenStack Juno from ready state.

OpenCrowbar Packstack install demonstrates that abstracting hardware to ready state smooths install process.  It’s a working balance: Crowbar gets the hardware, O/S & networking right while Packstack takes care of OpenStack.

LAYERSThe Crowbar team produced the first open OpenStack installer back in 2011 and it’s been frustrating to watch the community fragment around building a consistent operational model.  This is not an OpenStack specific problem, but I think it’s exaggerated in a crowded ecosystem.

When I step back from that experience, I see an industry wide pattern of struggle to create scale deployments patterns that can be reused.  Trying to make hardware uniform is unicorn hunting, so we need to create software abstractions.  That’s exactly why IaaS is powerful and the critical realization behind the OpenCrowbar approach to physical ready state.

So what has our team created?  It’s not another OpenStack installer – we just made the existing one easier to use.

We build up a ready state infrastructure that makes it fast and repeatable to use Packstack, one of the leading open OpenStack installers.  OpenCrowbar can do the same for the OpenStack Chef cookbooks or Salt Formula.   It can even use Saltstack, Chef and Puppet together (which we do for the Packstack work)!  Plus we can do it on multiple vendors hardware and with different operating systems.   Plus we build the correct networks!

For now, the integration is available as a private beta (inquiries welcome!) because our team is not in the OpenStack support business – we are in the “get scale systems to ready state and integrate” business.  We are very excited to work with people who want to take this type of functionality to the next level and build truly repeatable, robust and upgradable application deployments.

Tweaking DefCore to subdivide OpenStack platform (proposal for review)

The following material will be a major part of the discussion for The OpenStack Board meeting on Monday 10/20.  Comments and suggest welcome!

OpenStack in PartsFor nearly two years, the OpenStack Board has been moving towards creating a common platform definition that can help drive interoperability.  At the last meeting, the Board paused to further review one of the core tenants of the DefCore process (Item #3: Core definition can be applied equally to all usage models).

Outside of my role as DefCore chair, I see the OpenStack community asking itself an existential question: “are we one platform or a suite of projects?”  I’m having trouble believing “we are both” is an acceptable answer.

During the post-meeting review, Mark Collier drafted a Foundation supported recommendation that basically creates an additional core tier without changing the fundamental capabilities & designated code concepts.  This proposal has been reviewed by the DefCore committee (but not formally approved in a meeting).

The original DefCore proposed capabilities set becomes the “platform” level while capability subsets are called “components.”  We are considering two initial components, Compute & Object, and both are included in the platform (see illustration below).  The approach leaves the door open for new core component to exist both under and outside of the platform umbrella.

In the proposal, OpenStack vendors who meet either component or platform requirements can qualify for the “OpenStack Powered” logo; however, vendors using the only a component (instead of the full platform) will have more restrictive marks and limitations about how they can use the term OpenStack.

This approach addresses the “is Swift required?” question.  For platform, Swift capabilities will be required; however, vendors will be able to implement the Compute component without Swift and implement the Object component without Nova/Glance/Cinder.

It’s important to note that there is only one yard stick for components or the platform: the capabilities groups and designed code defined by the DefCore process.  From that perspective, OpenStack is one consistent thing.  This change allows vendors to choose sub-components if that serves their business objectives.

It’s up to the community to prove the platform value of all those sub-components working together.

OpenStack Goldilocks’ Syndrome: three questions to help us find our bearings

Goldilocks Atlas

Action: Please join Stefano. Allison, Sean and me in Paris on Monday, November 3rd, in the afternoon (schedule link)

If wishes were fishes, OpenStack’s rapid developer and user rise would include graceful process and commercial transitions too.  As a Foundation board member, it’s my responsibility to help ensure that we’re building a sustainable ecosystem for the project.  That’s a Goldilock’s challenge because adding either too much or too little controls and process will harm the project.

In discussions with the community, that challenge seems to breaks down into three key questions:

After last summit, a few of us started a dialog around Hidden Influencers that helps to frame these questions in an actionable way.  Now, it’s time for us to come together and talk in Paris in the hallways and specifically on Monday, November 3rd, in the afternoon (schedule link).   From there, we’ll figure out about next steps using these three questions as a baseline.

If you’ve got opinions about these questions, don’t wait for Paris!  I’d love to start the discussion here in the comments, on twitter (@zehicle), by phone, with email or via carrier pidgins.

To improve flow, we must view OpenStack community as a Software Factory

This post was sparked by a conversation at OpenStack Atlanta between OpenStack Foundation board members Todd Moore (IBM) and Rob Hirschfeld (Dell/Community).  We share a background in industrial and software process and felt that sharing lean manufacturing translates directly to helping face OpenStack challenges.

While OpenStack has done an amazing job of growing contributors, scale has caused our code flow processes to be bottlenecked at the review stage.  This blocks flow throughout the entire system and presents a significant risk to both stability and feature addition.  Flow failures can ultimately lead to vendor forking.

Fundamentally, Todd and I felt that OpenStack needs to address system flows to build an integrated product.  The post expands on the “hidden influencers” issue and adds an additional challenge because improving flow requires that the community influences better understands the need to optimize work inter-project in a more systematic way.

Let’s start by visualizing the “OpenStack Factory”

Factory Floor

Factory Floor from Alpha Industries Wikipedia page

Imagine all of OpenStack’s 1000s of developers working together in a single giant start-up warehouse.  Each project in its own floor area with appropriate fooz tables, break areas and coffee bars.  It’s easy to visualize clusters of intent developers talking around tables or coding in dark corners while PTLs and TC members dash between groups coordinating work.

Expand the visualization so that we can actually see the code flowing between teams as little colored boxes.  Giving project has a unique color allows us to quickly see dependencies between teams.  Some features are piled up waiting for review inside teams while others are waiting on pallets between projects waiting on needed cross features have not completed.  At release time, we’d be able to see PTLs sorting through stacks of completed boxes to pick which ones were ready to ship.

Watching a factory floor from above is a humbling experience and a key feature of systems thinking enlightenment in both The Phoenix Project and The Goal.  It’s very easy to be caught up in a single project (local optimization) and miss the broader system implications of local choices.

There is a large body of work about Lean Process for Manufacturing

You’ve already visualized OpenStack code creation as a manufacturing floor: it’s a small step to accept that we can use the same proven processes for software and physical manufacturing.

As features move between teams (work centers), it becomes obvious that we’ve created a very highly interlocked sequence of component steps needed to deliver product; unfortunately, we have minimal coordination between the owners of the work centers.  If a feature is needs a critical resource (think programmer) to progress then we rely on the resource to allocate time to the work.  Since that person’s manager may not agree to the priority, we have a conflict between system flow and individual optimization.

That conflict destroys flow in the system.

The number #1 lesson from lean manufacturing is that putting individual optimization over system optimization reduces throughput.  Since our product and people managers are often competitors, we need to work doubly hard to address system concerns.  Worse yet our inventory of work in process and the interdependencies between projects is harder to discern.  Unlike the manufacturing floor, our developers and project leads cannot look down upon it and see the physical work as it progresses from station to station in one single holistic view.  The bottlenecks that throttle the OpenStack workflow are harder to see but we can find them, as can be demonstrated later in this post.

Until we can engage the resource owners in balancing system flow, OpenStack’s throughput will decline as we add resources.  This same principle is at play in the famous aphorism: adding developers makes a late project later.

Is there a solution?

There are lessons from Lean Manufacturing that can be applied

  1. Make quality a priority (expand tests from function to integration)
  2. Ensure integration from station to station (prioritize working together over features)
  3. Make sure that owners of work are coordinating (expose hidden influencers)
  4. Find and mange from the bottleneck (classic Lean says find the bottleneck and improve that)
  5. Create and monitor a system view
  6. Have everyone value finished product, not workstation output

Added Subscript: I highly recommend reading Daniel Berrange’s email about this.