Art Fewell and I discuss DevOps, SDN, Containers & OpenStack [video + transcript]

A little while back, Art Fewell and I had two excellent discussions about general trends and challenges in the cloud and scale data center space.  Due to technical difficulties, the first (funnier one) was lost forever to NSA archives, but the second survived!

The video and transcript were just posted to Network World as part of Art’s on going interview series.  It was an action packed hour so I don’t want to re-post the transcript here.  I thought selected quotes (under the video) were worth calling out to whet your appetite for the whole tamale.

My highlights:

  1. .. partnering with a start-up was really hard, but partnering with an open source project actually gave us a lot more influence and control.
  2. Then we got into OpenStack, … we [Dell] wanted to invest our time and that we could be part of and would be sustained and transparent to the community.
  3. Incumbents are starting to be threatened by these new opened technologies … that I think levels of playing field is having an open platform.
  4. …I was pointing at you and laughing… [you’ll have to see the video]
  5. docker and containerization … potentially is disruptive to OpenStack and how OpenStack is operating
  6. You have to turn the crank faster and faster and faster to keep up.
  7. Small things I love about OpenStack … vendors are learning how to work in these open communities. When they don’t do it right they’re told very strongly that they don’t.
  8. It was literally a Power Point of everything that was wrong … [I said,] “Yes, that’s true. You want to help?”
  9. …people aiming missiles at your house right now…
  10. With containers you can sell that same piece of hardware 10 times or more and really pack in the workloads and so you get better performance and over subscription and so the utilization of the infrastructure goes way up.
  11. I’m not as much of a believer in that OpenStack eats the data center phenomena.
  12. First thing is automate. I’ve talked to people a lot about getting ready for OpenStack and what they should do. The bottom line is before you even invest in these technologies, automating your workloads and deployments is a huge component for being successful with that.
  13. Now, all of sudden the SDN layer is connecting these network function virtualization ..  It’s a big mess. It’s really hard, it’s really complex.
  14. The thing that I’m really excited about is the service architecture. We’re in the middle of doing on the RackN and Crowbar side, we’re in the middle of doing an architecture that’s basically turning data center operations into services.
  15. What platform as a service really is about, it’s about how you store the information. What services do you offer around the elastic part? Elastic is time based, it’s where you’re manipulating in the data.
  16. RE RackN: You can’t manufacture infrastructure but you can use it in a much “cloudier way”. It really redefines what you can do in a datacenter.
  17. That abstraction layer means that people can work together and actually share scripts
  18. I definitely think that OpenStack’s legacy will more likely be the community and the governance and what we’ve learned from that than probably the code.

Want CI Consul Love? OK! Run Consul in Travis-CI [example scripts]

If you are designing an application that uses microservice registration AND continuous integration then this post is for you!  If not, get with the program, you are a fossil.

Inside The EngineSunday night, I posted about the Erlang Consul client I wrote for our Behavior Driven Development (BDD) testing infrastructure.  That exposed a need to run a Consul service in the OpenCrowbar Travis-CI build automation that validates all of our pull requests.  Basically, Travis spins up the full OpenCrowbar API and workers (we call it the annealer) which in turn registers services in Consul.

NOTE: This is pseudo instructions.  In the actual code (here too), I created a script to install consul but this is more illustrative of the changes you need to make in your .travis.yml file.

In the first snippet, we download and unzip consul.  It’s in GO so that’s about all we need for an install.  I added a version check for logging validation.

before_script:
  - wget 'https://dl.bintray.com/mitchellh/consul/0.4.1_linux_amd64.zip'
  - unzip "0.4.1_linux_amd64.zip"
  - ./consul --version

In the second step, we setup the consul service and register it to itself in the background.  That allows the other services to access it.

script: 
  - ../consul agent -server -bootstrap-expect 1 -data-dir /tmp/consul &

After that, the BDD infrastructure can register the fake services that we expect (I created an erlang consul:reg_serv(“name”) routine that makes this super easy).  Once the services are registered, OpenCrowbar will check for the services and continue without trying to instantiate them (which it cannot do in Travis).

Here’s the pull request with the changes.

Erlang Consul Client

OpenCrowbar has been using Consul more and more deeply.  We’ve reached the point where we must register services on Consul to pass automated tests.

Consequently, I had to write a little Consul client in Erlang.

The client is very basic, but it seems to perform all of the required functions.  It relies on some other libraries in OpenCrowbar’s BDD but they are relatively self-contained.  Pulls welcome if you’d like to help build this out.

Here’s the code and the API reference.   Check in OpenCrowbar/BDD for latest updates and dependencies.

All About That Loop. Lessons from the OpenStack Product Mid-Cycle

OpenStack loves to track developer counts and committers, but velocity without A Feedback loop to set direction is unlikely to get us anywhere sustainable.

LoopLast week, I attended the first day of the OpenStack Product Working Group meeting.   My modest expectations (I just wanted them talking) were far exceeded.  The group managed to cover both strategic and tactical items including drafting a charter and discussing pending changes to the incubation process.

OpenStack needs a strong feedback loop from users and operators back to developers and vendors – statement made during the PM meeting.

The most critical wins from last week what the desire for the PM group to work more closely with the OpenStack technical leadership.  I’m excited to see the community continue to expand the scope of collaboration.

Why is this important?  Because developers and product managers need mutual respect to be effective.

The members of the Product team are leaders within their own organization responsible for talking to users and operators.  We rely on them to close the communication loop by both collecting feedback and explaining direction.  To accomplish this difficult job, the Product team must own articulating a vision for the future.

For OpenStack to succeed, we need to be listening intently to feedback about both how we are doing and if we are headed in the right direction.  Both are required to create a feedback loop.

After seeing this group in action, I’m excited to see what’s next.

Want to read more?

Get involved!  Join the discussion on the OpenStack Product mailing list!

too easy to bare metal? Ansible just works with OpenCrowbar

2012-01-15_10-21-12_716I’ve talked before about how OpenCrowbar distributes SSH keys automatically as part of its deployment process.  Now, it’s time to unleash some of the subsequent magic!

If you provision servers with your keys in place, then Ansible will just work with truly minimal configuration (one line in a file!).

Video Demo (steps bellow):

Here are my steps:

  1. Install OpenCrowbar and run some nodes to ready state [videos]
  2. Install Ansible [simple steps]
  3. Add hosts range “192.168.124.[81:83]  ansible_ssh_user=root” to the
    “/etc/ansible/hosts” file
  4. If you are really lazy, add “[Default] // host_key_checking = False” to your “~/.ansible.cfg” file
  5. now ping the hosts, “ansible all -m ping”
  6. pat yourself on the back, you’re done.
  7. to show off:
    1. touch all machines “ansible all -a “/bin/echo hello”
    2. look at types of Linux “ansible all -a “uname -a”

Further integration work can make this even more powerful.  

I’d like to see OpenCrowbar generate the Ansible inventory file from the discovery data and to map Ansible groups from deployments.  Crowbar could also call Ansible directly to use playbooks or even do a direct hand-off to Tower to complete an install without user intervention.

Wow, that would be pretty handy!   If you think so too, please join us in the OpenCrowbar community.

Online Meetup Today (1/13): Build a rock-solid foundation under your OpenStack cloud

Reminder: Online meetup w/ Crowbar + OpenStack DEMO TODAY

HFoundation Rawere’s the notice from the site (with my added Picture)

Building cloud infrastructure requires a rock-solid foundation. 

In this hour, Rob Hirschfeld will demo automated tooling, specifically OpenCrowbar, to prepare and integrate physical infrastructure to ready state and then use PackStack to install OpenStack.

 

The OpenCrowbar project started in 2011 as an OpenStack installer and had grown into a general purpose provisioning and infrastructure orchestration framework that works in parallel with multiple hardware vendors, operating systems and devops tools.  These tools create a fast, durable and repeatable environment to install OpenStack, Ceph, Kubernetes, Hadoop or other scale platforms.

 

Rob will show off the latest features and discuss key concepts from the Crowbar operational model including Ready State, Functional Operations and Late Binding. These concepts, built into Crowbar, can be applied generally to make your operations more robust and scalable.

Research showing that Short Lived Servers (“mayflies”) create efficiency at scale [DATA REQUESTED]

Last summer, Josh McKenty and I extended the puppies and cattle metaphor to limited life cattle we called “mayflies.” It was an attempt to help drive the cattle mindset (I think of it as social engineering, or maybe PsychOps) by forcing churn. I’ve come to think of it a step in between cattle and chaos monkeys (see Adrian Cockcroft).

While our thoughts were on mainly ops patterns, I’ve heard that there could be a real operational benefit from encouraging this behavior. The increased turn over in the environment improves scheduler optimization, planned load drains and coping with platform/environment migration.

Now we have a chance to quantify this benefit: a college student (disclosure: he’s my son) has created a data center emulation to see if Mayflies help with utilization. His model appears to work.

Now, he needs some real world data, here’s his request for assistance [note: he needs data by 1/20 to be included in this term]:

Hello!

I am Alexander Hirschfeld, a freshman at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. I am working on an independent study about Mayflies, a new idea in virtual machine management in cloud computing. Part of this management is load balancing and resource allocation for virtual machines across a collection of servers. The emulation that I am working on needs a realistic set of data to be the most accurate when modeling the results of using the methods outlined by the theory of mayflies.

Mayflies are an extension of the puppies verses cattle approach to machines, they are the extreme version of cattle as they have a known limited lifespan, such as 7 days. This requires the users of the cloud to build inherently more automated and fault-resistant applications. If you could send me a collection of the requests for new virtual machines(per standard unit of time and their requested specs/size), as well as an average lifetime for the virtual machines (or a graph or list of designated/estimated life times), and a basic summary of the collection of servers running the virtual machines(number, ram, cores), I would be better able to understand how Mayflies can affect a cloud.

Thanks,
Alexander Hirschfeld, twitter: @d-qoi

Needless to say, I’m really excited about the progress on demonstrating some the impact of this practice and am looking forward to posting about his results in the near future.

If you post in the comments, I will make sure you are connected to Alex.