We need DevOps without Borders! Is that “Hybrid DevOps?”

The RackN team has been working on making DevOps more portable for over five years.  Portable between vendors, sites, tools and operating systems means that our automation needs be to hybrid in multiple dimensions by design.

Why drive for hybrid?  It’s about giving users control.

launch!I believe that application should drive the infrastructure, not the reverse.  I’ve heard may times that the “infrastructure should be invisible to the user.”  Unfortunately, lack of abstraction and composibility make it difficult to code across platforms.  I like the term “fidelity gap” to describe the cost of these differences.

What keeps DevOps from going hybrid?  Shortcuts related to platform entangled configuration management.

Everyone wants to get stuff done quickly; however, we make the same hard-coded ops choices over and over again.  Big bang configuration automation that embeds sequence assumptions into the script is not just technical debt, it’s fragile and difficult to upgrade or maintain.  The problem is not configuration management (that’s a critical component!), it’s the lack of system level tooling that forces us to overload the configuration tools.

What is system level tooling?  It’s integrating automation that expands beyond configuration into managing sequence (aka orchestration), service orientation, script modularity (aka composibility) and multi-platform abstraction (aka hybrid).

My ops automation experience says that these four factors must be solved together because they are interconnected.

What would a platform that embraced all these ideas look like?  Here is what we’ve been working towards with Digital Rebar at RackN:

Mono-Infrastructure IT “Hybrid DevOps”
Locked into a single platform Portable between sites and infrastructures with layered ops abstractions.
Limited interop between tools Adaptive to mix and match best-for-job tools.  Use the right scripting for the job at hand and never force migrate working automation.
Ad hoc security based on site specifics Secure using repeatable automated processes.  We fail at security when things get too complex change and adapt.
Difficult to reuse ops tools Composable Modules enable Ops Pipelines.  We have to be able to interchange parts of our deployments for collaboration and upgrades.
Fragile Configuration Management Service Oriented simplifies API integration.  The number of APIs and services is increasing.  Configuration management is not sufficient.
 Big bang: configure then deploy scripting Orchestrated action is critical because sequence matters.  Building a cluster requires sequential (often iterative) operations between nodes in the system.  We cannot build robust deployments without ongoing control over order of operations.

Should we call this “Hybrid Devops?”  That sounds so buzz-wordy!

I’ve come to believe that Hybrid DevOps is the right name.  More technical descriptions like “composable ops” or “service oriented devops” or “cross-platform orchestration” just don’t capture the real value.  All these names fail to capture the portability and multi-system flavor that drives the need for user control of hybrid in multiple dimensions.

Simply put, we need devops without borders!

What do you think?  Do you have a better term?

OpenStack Shared Community Values? Here’s my seven, let’s compare

The recent discussion about OpenStack API vs Implementation had led to several discussions about “OpenStack Values.”  While entertaining, they ultimately show that we have a lot of conflicting desires and opinions about the project.  In fact, the term “values” is itself hard to define.

Consequently, I wanted to try to capture what I see as OpenStack’s current values (not my personal ones for the project – those are in the post script). I’ve tried to put everything in positive terms, but value choices always have positive and negative impacts.

Rank Value Provides Possible Downsides
1 Upstreaming Share code base and community effort “First in” wins

Latest over stability

Measure value in commits

2 Vendor’s taking initiative Broad Participation

Free marketing buzz

No one wants to say no because of Vendor bias perception
3 End-to-end open source No licenses required for scale users and developers Build, don’t buy wastes a lot of effort

Does not align with users who want to pay for services

4 Developer leadership Lots of code being created Not many user requirements being considered
5 Figuring out API via implementation Fast iterations Frustrating APIs

API depreciation

6 Passionate discussion Diversity of opinion

Drama attracts attention

“Unfriendly” community

Loudest voice wins

Cross culture challenges

7 Being able to contribute broadly Generally maintainable platform Deep skills in subject matters

Best tool for the job

In my experience, if you don’t align with a communities values then you’re going to be very unhappy in the community.  I’ve watched this happen to project founders and the community changed around them.  Let’s all RAGE QUIT!

So, this makes me reflect on my own open source values. I’d start with pragmatic utility, transparent action, principle driven decisions, iterative design and data driven decisions.

What do you value most in open communities?

APIs and Implementations collide at OpenStack Interop: The Oracle Zones vs VMs Debate

I strive to stay neutral as OpenStack DefCore co-chair; however, as someone asking for another Board term, it’s important to review my thinking so that you can make an informed voting decision.

DefCore, while always on the edge of controversy, recently became ground zero for the “what is OpenStack” debate [discussion write up]. My preferred small core “it’s an IaaS product” answer is only one side. Others favor “it’s an open cloud community” while another faction champions an “open cloud platform.” I’m struggling to find a way that it can be all together at the same time.

The TL;DR is that, today, OpenStack vendors are required to implement a system that can run Linux guests. This is an example of an implementation over API bias because there’s nothing in the API that drives that specific requirement.

From a pragmatic “get it done” perspective, OpenStack needs to remain implementation driven for now. That means that we care that “OpenStack” clouds run VMs.

While there are pragmatic reasons for this, I think that long term success will require OpenStack to become an API specification. So today’s “right answer” actually undermines the long term community value. This has been a long standing paradox in OpenStack.

Breaking the API to implementation link allows an ecosystem to grow with truly alternate implementations (not just plug-ins). This is a threat to the community “upstream first” mentality.  OpenStack needs to be confident enough in the quality and utility of the shared code base that it can allow competitive implementations. Open communities should not need walls to win but they do need clear API definition.

What is my posture for this specific issue?  It’s complicated.

First, I think that the user and ecosystem expectations are being largely ignored in these discussions. Many of the controversial items here are vendor initiatives, not user needs. Right now, I’ve heard clearly that those expectations are for OpenStack to be an IaaS the runs VMs. OpenStack really needs to focus on delivering a reliably operable VM based IaaS experience. Until that’s solid, the other efforts are vendor noise.

Second, I think that there are serious test gaps that jeopardize the standard. The fundamental premise of DefCore is that we can use the development tests for API and behavior validation. We chose this path instead of creating an independent test suite. We either need to address tests for interop within the current body of tests or discuss splitting the efforts. Both require more investment than we’ve been willing to make.

We have mechanisms in place to collects data from test results and expand the test base.  Instead of creating new rules or guidelines, I think we can work within the current framework.

The simple answer would be to block non-VM implementations; however, I trust that cloud consumers will make good decisions when given sufficient information.  I think we need to fix the tests and accept non-VM clouds if they pass the corrected tests.

For this and other reasons, I want OpenStack vendors to be specific about the configurations that they test and support. We took steps to address this in DefCore last year but pulled back from being specific about requirements.  In this particular case, I believe we should require the official OpenStack vendor to state clear details about their supported implementation.  Customers will continue vote with their wallet about which configuration details are important.

This is a complex issue and we need community input.  That means that we need to hear from you!  Here’s the TC Position and the DefCore Patch.

Operators, they don’t want to swim Upstream

Operators Dinner 11/10

Nov 10, Palo Alto Operators Dinner

Last Tuesday, I had the honor of joining an OpenStack scale operators dinner. Foundation executives, Jonathan Bryce and Lauren Sell, were also on the guest list so talk naturally turned to “how can OpenStack better support operators.” Notably, the session was distinctly not OpenStack bashing.

The conversation was positive, enthusiastic and productive, but one thing was clear: the OpenStack default “we’ll fix it in the upstream” answer does not work for this group of operators.

What is upstreaming?  A sans nuance answer is that OpenStack drives fixes and changes in the next community release (longer description).  The project and community have a tremendous upstream imperative that pervades the culture so deeply that we take it for granted.  Have an issue with OpenStack?  Submit a patch!  Is there any other alternative?

Upstreaming [to trunk] makes perfect sense considering the project vendor structure and governance; however, it is a very frustrating experience for operators.   OpenStack does have robust processes to backport fixes and sustain past releases and documentation; yet, the feeling at the table was that they are not sufficiently operator focused.

Operators want fast, incremental and pragmatic corrections to the code and docs they are deploying (which is often two releases back).  They want it within the community, not from individual vendors.

There are great reasons for focusing on upstream trunk.  It encourages vendors to collaborate and makes it much easier to add and expand the capabilities of the project.  Allowing independent activity on past releases creates a forward integration mess and could make upgrades even harder.  It will create divergence on APIs and implementation choices.

The risk of having a stable, independently sustained release is that operators have less reason to adopt the latest shiny release.  And that is EXACTLY what they are asking for.

Upstreaming is a core value to OpenStack and essential to our collaborative success; however, we need to consider that it is not the right answer to all questions.  Discussions at that dinner reinforced that pushing everything to latest trunk creates a significant barrier for OpenStack operators and users.

What are your experiences?  Is there a way to balance upstreaming with forking?  How can we better serve operators?

To avoid echo chamber, OpenStack must embrace competitive cloud ecosystem

wpid-20151023_100533.jpg
Japanese Bullet Train View

I was in Japan before the Tokyo summit on a bullet train to Kyoto watching the mix of heavy industry and bucolic mountains pass by. That scene reflects an OpenStack duality: we want to be both a dominant platform delivering core cloud services and an open source values driven collective.

First, I fundamentally believe in the success of OpenStack as the open virtual infrastructure management platform.

I believe that we have solved the virtual compute/storage/network problem sufficiently to become the de facto open IaaS platform. While not perfect, the technologies are sufficient assuming we continue to improve ease of use and operational hardening. Pursing that base capability is my primary motivation for DefCore work.

I don’t believe that the OpenStack community is, or should try to become, the authority on “all things cloud.”

In the presence of Amazon, VMware, Microsoft and Google, we cannot make that claim with any degree of self-respect. Even newcomers like DigitalOcean have an undeniable footprint and influence. Those vendor platforms drive cloud ecosystems and technologies which foster fast innovation because there is no friction to joining their ecosystems and they are sufficiently large and stable enough to represent a target market. We’ve seen clear signs from Rackspace, HP and others that platform diversity improves cloud strength.

I continue to think we (OpenStack) spend too much time evaluating what is “in” or “out” of the project and too little time talking about what’s “on,” “under” and “with” the project like Kubernetes, Mesos, Docker, SDN, Hadoop and Ceph. That type of thinking creates distance between OpenStack efforts and the majority of the market.

What motivates the drive to an all open captive community? It’s the reasonable concern that critical parts of the infrastructure will become pay-to-play. For example, what if a non-OpenStack alternative to Heat Orchestration gained popularity for OpenStack implementers. Perhaps something that ran on Amazon also. That would create external pressure that would drive internal priorities. These “non-OpenStack” products would then have influence without having to contribute back to upstream.

Can we afford to have external entities driving internal priorities? Hell yes, that’s what customer adoption looks like.

OpenStack does not own the market sufficiently to create cloud echo chamber. The next wave of cloud innovation (my money is on container platforms) will follow the path of least resistance and widest adoption. We need to embrace that these innovations will not all be inside our community so that we can welcome them as part of our ecosystem. The community needs to find peace with that.

As Docker rises above (and disrupts) clouds, I’m thinking about their community landscape

Watching the lovefest of DockerConf last week had me digging up my April 2014 “Can’t Contain(erize) the Hype” post.  There’s no doubt that Docker (and containers more broadly) is delivering on it’s promise.  I was impressed with the container community navigating towards an open platform in RunC and vendor adoption of the trusted container platforms.

I’m a fan of containers and their potential; yet, remotely watching the scope and exuberance of Docker partnerships seems out of proportion with the current capabilities of the technology.

The latest update to the Docker technology, v1.7, introduces a lot of important network, security and storage features.  The price of all that progress is disruption to ongoing work and integration to the ecosystem.

There’s always two sides to the rapid innovation coin: “Sweet, new features!  Meh, breaking changes to absorb.”

Docker Ecosystem Explained

Docker Ecosystem Explained

There remains a confusion between Docker the company and Docker the technology.  I like how the chart (right) maps out potential areas in the Docker ecosystem.  There’s clearly a lot of places for companies to monetize the technology; however, it’s not as clear if the company will be able to secede lucrative regions, like orchestration, to become a competitive landscape.

While Docker has clearly delivered a lot of value in just a year, they have a fair share of challenges ahead.  

If OpenStack is a leading indicator, we can expect to see vendor battlegrounds forming around networking and storage.  Docker (the company) has a chance to show leadership and build community here yet could cause harm by giving up the arbitrator role be a contender instead.

One thing that would help control the inevitable border skirmishes will be clear definitions of core, ecosystem and adjacencies.  I see Docker blurring these lines with some of their tools around orchestration, networking and storage.  I believe that was part of their now-suspended kerfuffle with CoreOS.

Thinking a step further, parts of the Docker technology (RunC) have moved over to Linux Foundation governance.  I wonder if the community will drive additional shared components into open governance.  Looking at Node.js, there’s clear precedent and I wonder if Joyent’s big Docker plans have them thinking along these lines.

Hidden costs of Cloud? No surprises, it’s still about complexity = people cost

Last week, Forbes and ZDnet posted articles discussing the cost of various cloud (451 source material behind wall) full of dollar per hour costs analysis.  Their analysis talks about private infrastructure being an order of magnitude cheaper (yes, cheaper) to own than public cloud; however, the open source price advantages offered by OpenStack are swallowed by added cost of finding skilled operators and its lack of maturity.

At the end of the day, operational concerns are the differential factor.

The Magic 8 Cube

The Magic 8 Cube

These articles get tied down into trying to normalize clouds to $/vm/hour analysis and buried the lead that the operational decisions about what contributes to cloud operational costs.   I explored this a while back in my “magic 8 cube” series about six added management variations between public and private clouds.

In most cases, operations decisions is not just about cost – they factor in flexibility, stability and organizational readiness.  From that perspective, the additional costs of public clouds and well-known stacks (VMware) are easily justified for smaller operations.  Using alternatives means paying higher salaries and finding talent that requires larger scale to justify.

Operational complexity is a material cost that strongly detracts from new platforms (yes, OpenStack – we need to address this!)

Unfortunately, it’s hard for people building platforms to perceive the complexity experienced by people outside their community.  We need to make sure that stability and operability are top line features because complexity adds a very real cost because it comes directly back to cost of operation.

In my thinking, the winners will be solutions that reduce BOTH cost and complexity.  I’ve talked about that in the past and see the trend accelerating as more and more companies invest in ops automation.