OpenStack automated high-availability deploy reality, SUSE shows off chops with Crowbar

While I’ve been focused on delivering next-generation kick-aaS-i-ness with Crowbar v2 (now called OpenCrowbar) and helping the Dell and Red Hat co-engineer a OpenStack Powered Cloud, SUSE has been continuing to expand and polish the OpenStack deployment on Crowbar v1.  I’m always impressed by commit activity (SUSE is the top committer in the Crowbar project) and was excited to see their Havana launch announcement.

Using Crowbar v1, SUSE is delivering a seriously robust automated OpenStack Havana implementation.  They have taken the time to build high availability (HA) across the framework including for Neutron, Heat and Ceilometer.

As an OpenStack Foundation board member, I hear a lot of hand-wringing in the community about ops practices and asking “is OpenStack is ready for the enterprise?”  While I’m not sure how to really define “enterprise,” I do know that SUSE Cloud Havana release version also) shows that it’s possible to deliver a repeatable and robust OpenStack deployment.

This effort shows some serious DevOps automation chops and, since Crowbar is open, everyone in the community can benefit from their tuning.   Of course, I’d love to see these great capabilities migrate into the very active StackForge Chef OpenStack cookbooks that OpenCrowbar is designed to leverage.

Creating HA automation is a great achievement and an important milestone in capturing the true golden fleece – automated release-to-release upgrades.  We built the OpenCrowbar annealer with this objective in mind and I feel like it’s within reach.

Competition should be core to OpenStack Technical Meritocracy

In my work at Dell, Technical Meritocracy means that we recognize and promote demonstrated talent into leadership roles. As a leader, one has to make technical judgments (OK, informed opinions) that focus limited resources in the (hopefully) right places. Being promoted does not automatically make someone right all the time.

I believe that good leaders recognize the value of a diverse set of opinions and the learning value of lean deliverables.

OpenStack is an amazingly diverse and evolving community. Leading in OpenStack requires a level of humility that forces me to reconsider my organization hierarchical thinking around “technical meritocracy.” Instead of a hierarchy where leadership chooses right and wrong, rising in the community meritocracy is about encouraging technical learning and user participation.

OpenStack is a melting pot of many interests and companies. Some of them naturally aligned (customers+vendors) and others are otherwise competitive (vendors). The vast majority of contribution to OpenStack is sponsored – companies pay people to participate and fund the foundation that organizes events. That does not diminish our enthusiasm for the community or open values, but it adds an additional dimension

If we are really seeking a Technical Meritocracy, we must create a place where ideas, teams, projects and companies can pursue different approaches within OpenStack. This is essential to our long term success because it provides a clear way for people to experiment within the project. Pushing away alternate approaches is likely to lead to forking. Specifically, I believe that the mostly likely competitor to any current OpenStack project will be that project’s .next version!

Calls for a “benevolent dictator” imply that our meritocracy has a single person with perspective on right and wrong. Not only is OpenStack simply too complex, I see our central design tenant as enabling multiple approaches to work it out in the community. This is especially important because many aspects of OpenStack are not one-size-fits all. The target diversity of our community requires that we enable multiple approaches so we can expand our user base.

The risk of anointing a single person, approach or project as “the OpenStack way” may appear to streamline the project, but it really stifles innovation. We have a healthy ecosystem of vendors who gladly express opinions about the right way to implement OpenStack. They help us test OpenStack technical merit by finding out which opinions appeal to users. It is essential to our success to enable a vibrant diversity because I don’t think there’s a single right answer or approach.

In every case, those vendor opinions are based on focused markets and customer needs; consequently, our job in the community is to respect and incorporate these divergent needs and find consensus.

OpenStack Core Online Forum, Oct 16 13:30 UTC / Oct 22 0100 UTC

Go Online!OpenStack Community, you are invited on an online discussion about OpenStack Core on October 16th at UTC 13:30 (8:30 am US Central) and October 22nd at UTC 0100 (8:00 pm US Central)

At the next OpenStack Foundation Board meeting, we will be setting a timeline for implementing an OpenStack Core Definition process that promotes a clear and implementation driven metric for deciding which projects should be considered “required.”  This is your chance to review and influence the process!

We’ll review the OpenStack Core Definition process (20 minutes) and then open up the channel for discussion using the IRC (#openstack-meeting) & Google Hangout on Air (link posted in IRC).

The forum will be coordinated through the IRC channel for links and questions.

Can’t make it?  The session was recorded > here!

How to build a community? Watch OpenStack’s Anne Gentle

wow girlI strongly believe that learning to operate in a collaborative community is a learned skill.  It’s also #1 career talent that I look for when I screen resumes (Linux experience is #2 and my team is hiring).

That’s why I’m simply humbled when I watch some of the OpenStack leaders work to support our community.  It’s worth supporting these efforts in every way possible.

In this specific case, OpenStack (under Anne Gentle‘s leadership) is actively recruiting both mentors and interns for the Outreach Program for Women. Rackspace is sponsoring one intern, and I’m still seeking funding for additional interns. Support levels start at $5750 for one intern.

Here her comments about the program:

OpenStack provides open source software for building public and private clouds. We are constantly moving and growing and very excited to invite newcomers to our community. For a third round, OpenStack is participating in GNOME Outreach Program for Women. As you may know, representation of women among free and open source participants has been cited at 3% [ref] as contrasted with the percentages of computing degrees earned by women (all at over 10% higher) in the US. Eek! At the October 2012 OpenStack Summit, Anne Gentle led an unconference session about including more women in OpenStack and identified one of the goals as bringing more newcomers to OpenStack. The GNOME Outreach program is an excellent way for OpenStack to meet that inclusion goal, and we specifically want to reach out to women who are interested in open source. The program starts in December 2013, going until March 2014. Also, we have been able to support our interns meeting their mentors at the OpenStack Summit, which would be in April 2014. You can find out all the details about how to apply to an OpenStack spot by going to OpenStack For Women.

Doing is Doing – my 10 open source principles

2013-07-14_17-28-21_468Open source projects’ greatest asset is their culture and FOSS practitioners need to deliberately build and expand it. To me, culture is not soft or vague.  Culture is something specific and actionable that we need to define and hold people accountable for.

I have simple principles that guide me in working in open source.   At their root, they are all simply “focus on the shared work.”

I usually sum them up as “Doing is Doing.”  While that’s an excellent test to see if you’re making the right choices, I suspect many will not find that tautology sufficiently actionable.

The 10 principles I try to model in open source leadership:

  1. Leadership includes service: connecting, education, documentation and testing
  2. Promotion is a two-edged sword – leaders needs to take extra steps to limit self-promotion or we miss hearing the community voice.
  3. Collaboration must be modeled by the leaders with other leaders.
  4. Vision must be articulated, but shared in a way that leaves room for new ideas and tactical changes.
  5. Announcements should be based on available capability not intention. In open source, there is less need for promises and forward-looking statements because your actions are transparent.
  6. Activity (starting from code and beyond) should be visible (Github = social coding) – it’s the essence of collaboration.
  7. Testing is essential because it allows other people to join with reduced risk.
  8. Docs are essential because it reduces friction for users to adopt.
  9. Upstreaming (unlike Forking) is a team sport so be prepared for some give-and-take.
  10. It’s not just about code, open source is about solving shared problems together.  When we focus on the shared goals (“the doing”) then the collaboration comes naturally.

Taking OpenStack Core discussions to community

core flowTHIS POST IS #9 IN A SERIES ABOUT “WHAT IS CORE.”

We’ve been building up to a broad discussion about the OpenStack Core and I’d like to invite everyone in the OpenStack community to participate (review latest).

Alan Clark (Board Chairman) officially kicked off this open discussion with his post on the OpenStack blog last week.  And we’re trying to have face-to-face events for dialog like the Core meetup tonight in San Francisco.  Look for more to come!

Of course, this will also be a topic at the summit (Alan and I submitted two sessions about this).  The Board needs to move this forward in the November meeting, so NOW is the time to review and give us input.

refined: 10 OpenStack Core Positions

core flowTHIS POST IS #8 IN A SERIES ABOUT “WHAT IS CORE.”

Last week, I posted a streamlined visual of the core discussion that distilled the 12 positions into 10.  Here are reordered and cleaned up matching positions.  This should make it much easier to understand the context.

Note 11/3: The Core Definition is now maintained on the OpenStack Wiki.  This list may not reflect the latest changes.
  1. Implementations that are Core can use OpenStack trademark (OpenStack™)

    1. This is the legal definition of “core” and the  why it matters to  the community.

    2. We want to make sure that the OpenStack™ mark means something.

    3. The OpenStack™ mark is not the same as the OpenStack brand; however, the Board uses it’s control of the mark as a proxy to help manage the brand.

  2. Core is a subset of the whole project

    1. The OpenStack project is supposed to be a broad and diverse community with new projects entering incubation and new implementations being constantly added.  This innovation is vital to OpenStack but separate from the definition of Core.

    2. There may be other marks that are managed separately by the foundation, and available for the platform ecosystem as per the Board’s discretion

    3. “OpenStack API Compatible ” mark not part of this discussion and should be not be assumed.

  3. Core definition can be applied equally to all usage models

    1. There should not be multiple definitions of OpenStack depending on the operator (public, private, community, etc)

    2. While expected that each deployment is identical, the differences must be quantifiable

  4. Claiming OpenStack requiring use of designated upstream code

    1. Implementation’s claiming the OpenStack™ mark must use the OpenStack upstream code (or be using code submitted to upstream)

    2. You are not OpenStack, if you pass all the tests but do not use the API framework

    3. This prevents people from using the API without joining the community

    4. This also surfaces bit-rot in alternate implementations to the larger community

    5. This behavior improves interoperability because there is more shared code between implementation

  5. Projects must have an open reference implementation

    1. OpenStack will require an open source reference base plug-in implementation for projects (if not part of OpenStack, license model for reference plug-in must be compatible).

    2. Definition of a plug-in: alternate backend implementations with a common API framework that uses common _code_ to implement the API

    3. This expects that projects (where technically feasible) are expected to implement a plug-in or extension architecture.

    4. This is already in place for several projects and addresses around ecosystem support, enabling innovation

    5. Reference plug-ins are, by definition, the complete capability set.  It is not acceptable to have “core” features that are not functional in the reference plug-in

    6. This will enable alternate implementations to offer innovative or differentiated features without forcing changes to the reference plug-in implementation

    7. This will enable the reference to expand without forcing other  alternate implementations to match all features and recertify

  6. Vendors may substitute alternate implementations

    1. If a vendor plug-in passes all relevant tests then it can be considered a full substitute for the reference plug-in

    2. If a vendor plug-in does NOT pass all relevant test then the vendor is required to include the open source reference in the implementation.

    3. Alternate implementations may pass any tests that make sense

    4. Alternate implementations should add tests to validate new functionality.

    5. They must have all the must-pass tests (see #10) to claim the OpenStack mark.

  7. OpenStack Implementations are verified by open community tests

    1. Vendor OpenStack implementations must achieve 100% of must-have coverage?

    2. Implemented tests can be flagged as may-have requires list  [Joshua McKenty]

    3. Certifiers will be required to disclose their testing gaps.

    4. This will put a lot of pressure on the Tempest project

    5. Maintenance of the testing suite to become a core Foundation responsibility.  This may require additional resources

    6. Implementations and products are allowed to have variation based on publication of compatibility

    7. Consumers must have a way to determine how the system is different from reference (posted, discovered, etc)

    8. Testing must respond in an appropriate way on BOTH pass and fail (the wrong return rejects the entire suite)

  8. Tests can be remotely or self-administered

    1. Plug-in certification is driven by Tempest self-certification model

    2. Self-certifiers are required to publish their results

    3. Self-certified are required to publish enough information that a 3rd party could build the reference implementation to pass the tests.

    4. Self-certified must include the operating systems that have been certified

    5. It is preferred for self-certified implementation to reference an OpenStack reference architecture “flavor” instead of defining their own reference.  (a way to publish and agree on flavors is needed)

    6. The Foundation needs to define a mechanism of dispute resolution. (A trust but verify model)

    7. As an ecosystem partner, you have a need to make a “works against OpenStack” statement that is supportable

    8. API consumer can claim working against the OpenStack API if it works against any implementation passing all the “must have” tests(YES)

    9. API consumers can state they are working against the OpenStack API with some “may have” items as requirements

    10. API consumers are expected to write tests that validate their required behaviors (submitted as “may have” tests)

  9. A subset of tests are chosen by the Foundation as “must-pass”

    1. An OpenStack body will recommend which tests are elevated from may-have to must-have

    2. The selection of “must-pass” tests should be based on quantifiable information when possible.

    3. Must-pass tests should be selected from the existing body of “may-pass” tests.  This encourages people to write tests for cases they want supported.

    4. We will have a process by which tests are elevated from may to must lists

    5. Potentially: the User Committee will nominate tests that elevated to the board

  10. OpenStack Core means passing all “must-pass” tests

    1. The OpenStack board owns the responsibility to define ‘core’ – to approve ‘musts’

    2. We are NOT defining which items are on the list in this effort, just making the position that it is how we will define core

    3. May-have tests include items in the integrated release, but which are not core.

    4. Must haves – must comply with the Core criteria defined from the IncUp committee results

    5. Projects in Incubation or pre-Incubation are not to be included in the ‘may’ list

OpenStack’s Test Driven Core > it’s where I think “what is core” discussions are heading

THIS POST IS #7 IN A SERIES ABOUT “WHAT IS CORE.”

core lighthouse

In helping drive OpenStack’s “what is core” dialog, I’ve had the privilege of listening to a lot of viewpoints about what we are and should be.  Throughout the process, I’ve tried to put aside my positions and be an objective listener.  In this post, I’m expressing where I think this effort will lead us.

If OpenStack culture values implementation over API then our core definition should too.

How do we make a core definition that values implementation over API?  I think that our definition should also be based on what’s working in the field over qualitative definitional statements.  The challenge in defining core is to find a way to reinforce this culture in a quantifiable way.

The path forward lies in concrete decomposition (and not because you were talked to death on the sidewalk).

Concrete decomposition means breaking Core into small units for discussion like “is provisioning a single server critical?”  More importantly, we can use tests as the unit for decomposition.  Tests are gold when it comes to defining expected OpenStack behaviors.  In our tests, we have a description of which use-cases have been implemented.  Discussing those use-cases is much more finite than arguing over stable versus innovative development methodologies.

I believe that we are moving toward community tests playing an essential role in OpenStack.  As a believer in the value of BDD and CI, I think that placing high value on tests improves the project in fundamental ways beyond defining Core.  It creates a commercial motivation for contributors to add tests, inches us toward interoperability, and helps drive stability for users.  In these ways, using tests to measure OpenStack drives the right behaviors for the project.

Another consequence I anticipate is a new role for the User Committee (UC).  With a growing body of tests, the OpenStack Foundation needs a way to figure out the subset of tests which are required.  While the Technical Committee (TC) should demand a comprehensive suite of tests for all projects, they lack the perspective to figure out which use-cases are being implemented by our user base.  Gathering that data is already the domain of the UC so asking them to match implemented use-cases to tests seems like a natural extension of their role.

By having data supporting the elevation of tests to must-pass status, I envision a definition of Core that is based on how OpenStack is implemented.  That, in turn, will help drive our broader interoperability objectives.

Visualizing the OpenStack Core discussion points

THIS POST IS #6 IN A SERIES ABOUT “WHAT IS CORE.”

As we take the OpenStack Core discussion to a larger audience, I was asked to create the summary version the discussion points.  We needed a quick visual way to understand how these consensus statements interconnect and help provide context.  To address this need, I based it on a refined 10 core positions to create the following OpenStack Core flowchart.

core flow

The flow diagram below is grouped into three main areas: core definition (green), technical requirements (blue), and testing impacts (orange).

  1. Core Definition (green) walks through the fundamental scope and premise of the “what is core” discussion.  We are looking for the essential OpenStack: the parts that everyone needs and nothing more.  While OpenStack can be something much larger, core lives at the heart of the use-case venn diagram.  It’s the magical ice cream flavor that everyone loves like Triple Unicorn Rainbow Crunch.
  2. Technical Requirements (blue) covers some of the most contentious parts of the dialog.  This section states the expectation that OpenStack™ implementations must use parts the OpenStack code (you can’t just provide a compatible API).  It goes further to expect that we will maintain an open reference implementation and also identify places where parts of the code can be substituted with alternate implementations.  Examples of alternate implementations are plug-ins, API extensions, different hypervisors, and alternate libraries.
  3. Testing Impacts (orange) reviews some of the important new thinking around Core.  These points focus on the use of OpenStack community tests (e.g.: Tempest) to validate the total code base.  We expect users to be able to self-administer these tests or rely on an external validation.  Either way, we do not expect all tests to pass for all configurations; instead, the Foundation will identify a subset of the tests as required or must-pass.  The current thinking is that these must-pass tests will become the effective definition of OpenStack™ Core.

I hope this helps connect the dots on the core discussions so far.

I’d like to clean-up the positions to match the flow chart and cross reference.  Stay tuned!  This flowchart is a work in process – updates and suggestions are welcome!

READ POST IS #7: WHERE IS THIS GOING?

Community dialogue around “What is Core” positions

THIS POST IS #5 IN A SERIES ABOUT “WHAT IS CORE.”

by Rob Hirschfeld (cc) w/ attribution

The OpenStack Foundation Board has been having a broadening conservation about this topic.  Feeling left out?  Please don’t be!  Now is the time to start getting involved: we had to start very narrowly focused to avoid having the discussion continue to go in circles.  As we’ve expanding the dialog, we have incorporated significant feedback to drive consensus.

No matter where I go, people are passionate about the subject of OpenStack Core.

Overall, there is confusion of scope covered by “what is core” because people bring in their perspective from public, private solution, ecosystem or internal deployment objectives.  In discussion, everyone sees that we have to deal with issues around the OpenStack mark and projects first, but they are impatient to get into the deep issues.  Personally, we can get consensus on core and will always have a degree of healthy tension between user types.

The following are my notes, not my opinions.  I strive to faithfully represent a wide range of positions here.  Clarifications, comments and feedback are welcome!

Consensus Topics:

  • Reference/Alternate Implementation (not plug-in): Not using “plug-ins” to describe the idea that OpenStack projects should have a shared API with required code and clearly specified areas where code is replaceable.  It is the Technical Committee (TC) that makes these decisions.  The most meaningful language around this point is to say that OpenStack will have an open reference implementation with allowable alternate implementations.
  • Alternate implementations are useful:  We want to ensure upstream contribution and collaboration on the code base.  Reference implementations ensure that there’s a reason to keep open source OpenStack strong.  Alternate Implementations are important to innovation.
  • Small vs. Large Core: This is an ongoing debate about if OpenStack should have a lot of projects as part of core.  We don’t have an answer but people feel like we’re heading in a direction that resolves this question.
  • Everyone likes tests: We’re heading towards a definition of core that relies heavily on tests.  Everyone expresses concerns that this will place a lot of stress on Tempest (or another framework) and that needs to be addressed as we move forward.

Open Topics:

  • Monolithic vs. Granular Trademark:  We did not discuss if vendors will be able to claim OpenStack trademarks on subcomponents of the whole.  This is related to core but wide considered secondary.
  • API vs. implementation tension:  We accept that OpenStack will lead with implementation.   There’s no official policy that “we are not a standards body” but we may also have to state that tests are not a specification.  There’s a danger that tests will be considered more than they are.  What are they?  “They are an implementation and a source of information.  They are not the definition.”   We expect to have a working model that drives the API not vice versa.
  • Brouhaha about EC2 APIs:  It’s not clear if defining core helps address the OpenStack API discussion.  I hope it will but have not tested it.
  • Usability as core: I had many people insist that usability and ease of use should be as requirements for core because it supports adoption.  Our current positions do not have any statements to support this view.
  • Toxic neighbors: We have not discussed if use of the mark and criteria could be limited by what else you put in your product.  Are there implementation options that we’d consider toxic and automatically violate the mark?  Right now, the positions are worded that if you pass then you play even if you otherwise stink.
  • Which tests are required?  It appears that we’re moving towards using must-pass tests to define the core.  Moving towards tests determining core, we want actual field data to drive which tests are required. That will allow actual user experience to shape which tests are important rather than having it be a theoretical decision.  There’s some interest in asking the User Committee (UC) to recommend which tests are required.  This would be an added responsibility for the UC and needs more discussion.
  • Need visualization:  With 12 positions so far, it’s getting hard to keep it all together.  I’ve taken on an action item to create a diagram that shows which statements apply to which projects against the roles of ownership.

I’ve had some great discussions about core and am looking forward to many more.  I hope these notes help bring you up to speed.   As always, comments and discussion are welcome!

READ POST #6: VISUALIZING CORE