Post-OpenStack DefCore, I’m Chasing “open infrastructure” via cross-platform Interop

Like my previous DefCore interop windmill tilting, this is not something that can be done alone. Open infrastructure is a collaborative effort and I’m looking for your help and support. I believe solving this problem benefits us as an industry and individually as IT professionals.

2013-09-13_18-56-39_197So, what is open infrastructure?   It’s not about running on open source software. It’s about creating platform choice and control. In my experience, that’s what defines open for users (and developers are not users).

I’ve spent several years helping lead OpenStack interoperability (aka DefCore) efforts to ensure that OpenStack cloud APIs are consistent between vendors. I strongly believe that effort is essential to build an ecosystem around the project; however, in talking to enterprise users, I’ve learned that that their  real  interoperability gap is between that many platforms, AWS, Google, VMware, OpenStack and Metal, that they use everyday.

Instead of focusing inward to one platform, I believe the bigger enterprise need is to address automation across platforms. It is something I’m starting to call hybrid DevOps because it allows users to mix platforms, service APIs and tools.

Open infrastructure in that context is being able to work across platforms without being tied into one platform choice even when that platform is based on open source software. API duplication is not sufficient: the operational characteristics of each platform are different enough that we need a different abstraction approach.

We have to be able to compose automation in a way that tolerates substitution based on infrastructure characteristics. This is required for metal because of variation between hardware vendors and data center networking and services. It is equally essential for cloud because of variation between IaaS capabilities and service delivery models. Basically, those  minor  differences between clouds create significant challenges in interoperability at the operational level.

Rationalizing APIs does little to address these more structural differences.

The problem is compounded because the differences are not nicely segmented behind abstraction layers. If you work to build and sustain a fully integrated application, you must account for site specific needs throughout your application stack including networking, storage, access and security. I’ve described this as all deployments have 80% of the work common but the remaining 20% is mixed in with the 80% instead of being nicely layers. So, ops is cookie dough not vinaigrette.

Getting past this problem for initial provisioning on a single platform is a false victory. The real need is portable and upgrade-ready automation that can be reused and shared. Critically, we also need to build upon the existing foundations instead of requiring a blank slate. There is openness value in heterogeneous infrastructure so we need to embrace variation and design accordingly.

This is the vision the RackN team has been working towards with open source Digital Rebar project. We now able to showcase workload deployments (Docker, Kubernetes, Ceph, etc) on multiple cloud platforms that also translate to full bare metal deployments. Unlike previous generations of this tooling (some will remember Crowbar), we’ve been careful to avoid injecting external dependencies into the DevOps scripts.

While we’re able to demonstrate a high degree of portability (or fidelity) across multiple platforms, this is just the beginning. We are looking for users and collaborators who want to want to build open infrastructure from an operational perspective.

You are invited to join us in making open cross-platform operations a reality.

APIs and Implementations collide at OpenStack Interop: The Oracle Zones vs VMs Debate

I strive to stay neutral as OpenStack DefCore co-chair; however, as someone asking for another Board term, it’s important to review my thinking so that you can make an informed voting decision.

DefCore, while always on the edge of controversy, recently became ground zero for the “what is OpenStack” debate [discussion write up]. My preferred small core “it’s an IaaS product” answer is only one side. Others favor “it’s an open cloud community” while another faction champions an “open cloud platform.” I’m struggling to find a way that it can be all together at the same time.

The TL;DR is that, today, OpenStack vendors are required to implement a system that can run Linux guests. This is an example of an implementation over API bias because there’s nothing in the API that drives that specific requirement.

From a pragmatic “get it done” perspective, OpenStack needs to remain implementation driven for now. That means that we care that “OpenStack” clouds run VMs.

While there are pragmatic reasons for this, I think that long term success will require OpenStack to become an API specification. So today’s “right answer” actually undermines the long term community value. This has been a long standing paradox in OpenStack.

Breaking the API to implementation link allows an ecosystem to grow with truly alternate implementations (not just plug-ins). This is a threat to the community “upstream first” mentality.  OpenStack needs to be confident enough in the quality and utility of the shared code base that it can allow competitive implementations. Open communities should not need walls to win but they do need clear API definition.

What is my posture for this specific issue?  It’s complicated.

First, I think that the user and ecosystem expectations are being largely ignored in these discussions. Many of the controversial items here are vendor initiatives, not user needs. Right now, I’ve heard clearly that those expectations are for OpenStack to be an IaaS the runs VMs. OpenStack really needs to focus on delivering a reliably operable VM based IaaS experience. Until that’s solid, the other efforts are vendor noise.

Second, I think that there are serious test gaps that jeopardize the standard. The fundamental premise of DefCore is that we can use the development tests for API and behavior validation. We chose this path instead of creating an independent test suite. We either need to address tests for interop within the current body of tests or discuss splitting the efforts. Both require more investment than we’ve been willing to make.

We have mechanisms in place to collects data from test results and expand the test base.  Instead of creating new rules or guidelines, I think we can work within the current framework.

The simple answer would be to block non-VM implementations; however, I trust that cloud consumers will make good decisions when given sufficient information.  I think we need to fix the tests and accept non-VM clouds if they pass the corrected tests.

For this and other reasons, I want OpenStack vendors to be specific about the configurations that they test and support. We took steps to address this in DefCore last year but pulled back from being specific about requirements.  In this particular case, I believe we should require the official OpenStack vendor to state clear details about their supported implementation.  Customers will continue vote with their wallet about which configuration details are important.

This is a complex issue and we need community input.  That means that we need to hear from you!  Here’s the TC Position and the DefCore Patch.

DefCore Update – slowly taming the Interop hydra.

Last month, the OpenStack board charged the DefCore committee to tighten the specification. That means adding more required capabilities to the guidelines and reducing the number of exceptions (“flags”).  Read the official report by Chris Hoge.

Cartography by Dave McAlister is licensed under a. Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

It turns out interoperability is really, really hard in heterogenous environments because it’s not just about API – implementation choices change behavior.

I see this in both the cloud and physical layers. Since OpenStack is setup as a multi-vendor and multi-implementation (private/public) ecosystem, getting us back to a shared least common denominator is a monumental challenge. I also see a similar legacy in physical ops with OpenCrowbar where each environment is a snowflake and operators constantly reinvent the same tooling instead of sharing expertise.

Lack of commonality means the industry wastes significant effort recreating operational knowledge for marginal return. Increasing interop means reducing variations which, in turn, increases the stakes for vendors seeking differentiation.

We’ve been working on DefCore for years so that we could get to this point. Our first real Guideline, 2015.03, was an intentionally low bar with nearly half of the expected tests flagged as non-required. While the latest guidelines do not add new capabilities, they substantially reduce the number of exceptions granted. Further, we are in process of adding networking capabilities for the planned 2016.01 guideline (ready for community review at the Tokyo summit).

Even though these changes take a long time to become fully required for vendors, we can start testing interoperability of clouds using them immediately.

While, the DefCore guidelines via Foundation licensing policy does have teeth, vendors can take up to three years [1] to comply. That may sounds slow, but the real authority of the program comes from customer and vendor participation not enforcement [2].

For that reason, I’m proud that DefCore has become a truly diverse and broad initiative.

I’m further delighted by the leadership demonstrated by Egle Sigler, my co-chair, and Chris Hoge, the Foundation staff leading DefCore implementation.  Happily, their enthusiasm is also shared by many other people with long term DefCore investments including mid-cycle attendees Mark Volker (VMware), Catherine Deip (IBM) who is also a RefStack PTL, Shamail Tahir (EMC), Carol Barrett (Intel), Rocky Grober (Huawei), Van Lindberg (Rackspace), Mark Atwood (HP), Todd Moore (IBM), Vince Brunssen (IBM). We also had four DefCore related project PTLs join our mid-cycle: Kyle Mestery (Neutron), Nikhil Komawar (Glance),  John Dickinson (Swift), and Matthew Treinish (Tempest).

Thank you all for helping keep DefCore rolling and working together to tame the interoperability hydra!

[1] On the current schedule – changes will now take 1 year to become required – vendors have a three year tail! Three years? Since the last two Guideline are active, the fastest networking capabilities will be a required option is after 2016.01 is superseded in January 2017. Vendors who (re)license just before that can use the mark for 12 months (until January 2018!)

[2] How can we make this faster? Simple, consumers need to demand that their vendor pass the latest guidelines. DefCore provides Guidelines, but consumers checkbooks are the real power in the ecosystem.

Thanks! I’m enjoying my conversation with you

I write because I love to tell stories and to think about how actions we take today will impact tomorrow.  Ultimately, everything here is about a dialog with you because you are my sounding board and my critic.  I appreciate when people engage me about posts here and extend the conversation into other dimensions.  Feel free to call me on points and question my position – that’s what this is all about.

Thank you for being at part of my blog and joining in.  I’m looking forward to hearing more from you.

During the OpenStack Summit, I got to lead and participate in some excellent presentations and panels.  While my theme for this summit was interoperability, there are many other items discussed.

I hope you enjoy them.

Did one of these topics stand out?  Is there something I missed?  Please let me know!

OpenStack’s next hurdle: Interoperability. Why should you care?

SXSW life size Newton's Cradle

SXSW life size Newton’s Cradle

The OpenStack Board spent several hours (yes, hours) discussing interoperability related topics at the last board meeting.  Fundamentally, the community benefits when uses can operate easily across multiple OpenStack deployments (their own and/or public clouds).

Cloud interoperability: the ability to transfer workloads between systems without changes to the deployment operations management infrastructure.

This is NOT hybrid (which I defined as a workload transparently operating in multiple systems); however it is a prereq to achieve scalable hybrid operation.

Interoperability matters because the OpenStack value proposition is all about creating a common platform.  IT World does a good job laying out the problem (note, I work for Dell).  To create sites that can interoperate, we have to some serious lifting:

At the OpenStack Summit, there are multiple chances to engage on this.   I’m moderating a panel about Interop and also sharing a session about the highly related topic of Reference Architectures with Monty Tayor.

The Interop Panel (topic description here) is Tuesday @ 5:20pm.  If you join, you’ll get to see me try to stump our awesome panelists

  • Jonathan LaCour, DreamHost
  • Troy Toman, Rackspace
  • Bernard Golden,  Enstratius
  • Monty Taylor, OpenStack Board (and HP)
  • Peter Pouliot, Microsoft

PS: Oh, and I’m also talking about DevOps Upgrades Patterns during the very first session (see a preview).