OpenStack DefCore Review [interview by Jason Baker]

I was interviewed about DefCore by Jason Baker of Red Hat as part of my participation in OSCON Open Cloud Day (speaking Monday 11:30am).  This is just one of fifteen in a series of speaker interviews covering everything from Docker to Girls in Tech.

This interview serves as a good review of DefCore so I’m reposting it here:

Without giving away too much, what are you discussing at OSCON? What drove the need for DefCore?

I’m going to walk through the impact of the OpenStack DefCore process in real terms for users and operators. I’ll talk about how the process works and how we hope it will make OpenStack users’ lives better. Our goal is to take steps towards interoperability between clouds.

DefCore grew out of a need to answer hard and high stakes questions around OpenStack. Questions like “is Swift required?” and “which parts of OpenStack do I have to ship?” have very serious implications for the OpenStack ecosystem.

It was impossible to reach consensus about these questions in regular board meetings so DefCore stepped back to base principles. We’ve been building up a process that helps us make decisions in a transparent way. That’s very important in an open source community because contributors and users want ground rules for engagement.

It seems like there has been a lot of discussion over the OpenStack listservs over what DefCore is and what it isn’t. What’s your definition?

First, DefCore applies only to commercial uses of the OpenStack name. There are different rules for the integrated code base and community activity. That’s the place of most confusion.

Basically, DefCore establishes the required minimum feature set for OpenStack products.

The longer version includes that it’s a board managed process that’s designed to be very transparent and objective. The long-term objective is to ensure that OpenStack clouds are interoperable in a measurable way and that we also encourage our vendor ecosystem to keep participating in upstream development and creation of tests.

A final important component of DefCore is that we are defending the OpenStack brand. While we want a vibrant ecosystem of vendors, we must first have a community that knows what OpenStack is and trusts that companies using our brand comply with a meaningful baseline.

Are there other open source projects out there using “designated sections” of code to define their product, or is this concept unique to OpenStack? What lessons do you think can be learned from other projects’ control (or lack thereof) of what must be included to retain the use of the project’s name?

I’m not aware of other projects using those exact words. We picked up ‘designated sections’ because the community felt that ‘plug-ins’ and ‘modules’ were too limited and generic. I think the term can be confusing, but it was the best we found.

If you consider designated sections to be plug-ins or modules, then there are other projects with similar concepts. Many successful open source projects (Eclipse, Linux, Samba) are functionally frameworks that have very robust extensibility. These projects encourage people to use their code base creatively and then give back some (not all) of their lessons learned in the form of code contributes. If the scope returning value to upstream is too broad then sharing back can become onerous and forking ensues.

All projects must work to find the right balance between collaborative areas (which have community overhead to join) and independent modules (which allow small teams to move quickly). From that perspective, I think the concept is very aligned with good engineering design principles.

The key goal is to help the technical and vendor communities know where it’s safe to offer alternatives and where they are expected to work in the upstream. In my opinion, designated sections foster innovation because they allow people to try new ideas and to target specialized use cases without having to fight about which parts get upstreamed.

What is it like to serve as a community elected OpenStack board member? Are there interests you hope to serve that are difference from the corporate board spots, or is that distinction even noticeable in practice?

It’s been like trying to row a dragon boat down class III rapids. There are a lot of people with oars in the water but we’re neither all rowing together nor able to fight the current. I do think the community members represent different interests than the sponsored seats but I also think the TC/board seats are different too. Each board member brings a distinct perspective based on their experience and interests. While those perspectives are shaped by their employment, I’m very happy to say that I do not see their corporate affiliation as a factor in their actions or decisions. I can think of specific cases where I’ve seen the opposite: board members have acted outside of their affiliation.

When you look back at how OpenStack has grown and developed over the past four years, what has been your biggest surprise?

Honestly, I’m surprised about how many wheels we’ve had to re-invent. I don’t know if it’s cultural or truly a need created by the size and scope of the project, but it seems like we’ve had to (re)create things that we could have leveraged.

What are you most excited about for the “K” release of OpenStack?

The addition of platform services like database as a Service, DNS as a Service, Firewall as a Service. I think these IaaS “adjacent” services are essential to completing the cloud infrastructure story.

Any final thoughts?

In DefCore, we’ve moved slowly and deliberately to ensure people have a chance to participate. We’ve also pushed some problems into the future so that we could resolve the central issues first. We need to community to speak up (either for or against) in order for us to accelerate: silence means we must pause for more input.

OpenStack DefCore Update & 7/16 Community Reviews

The OpenStack Board effort to define “what is core” for commercial use (aka DefCore).  I have blogged extensively about this topic and rely on you to review that material because this post focuses on updates from recent activity.

First, Please Join Our Community DefCore Reviews on 7/16!

We’re reviewing the current DefCore process & timeline then talking about the Advisory Havana Capabilities Matrix (decoder).

To support global access, there are TWO meetings (both will also be recorded):

  1. July 16, 8 am PDT / 1500 UTC
  2. July 16, 6 pm PDT / 0100 UTC July 17

Note: I’m presenting about DefCore at OSCON on 7/21 at 11:30!

We want community input!  The Board is going discuss and, hopefully, approve the matrix at our next meeting on 7/22.  After that, the Board will be focused on defining Designated Sections for Havana and Ice House (the TC is not owning that as previously expected).

The DefCore process is gaining momentum.  We’ve reached the point where there are tangible (yet still non-binding) results to review.  The Refstack efforts to collect community test results from running clouds is underway: the Core Matrix will be fed into Refstack to validate against the DefCore required capabilities.

Now is the time to make adjustments and corrections!  

In the next few months, we’re going to be locking in more and more of the process as we get ready to make it part of the OpenStack by-laws (see bottom of minutes).

If you cannot make these meetings, we still want to hear from you!  The most direct way to engage is via the DefCore mailing list but 1×1 email works too!  Your input is import to us!

Kicking off discussion about OpenStack Core

What's in?I’ve been leading an effort with Alan Clark to define “what is OpenStack core” for the Foundation Board.  Now that I am sitting here at OSCON and celebrating OpenStack’s third birthday, I think it’s a great time to bring the general community into the discussion.

There is significant history behind this topic.  According to Foundation governance, the Technical Committee (TC) defines which incubated projects are integrated and the Board of Directors (I am one) determines which of the integrated projects are labeled as core.

When it comes to the core label, the stakes are high.

Defining core is a convoluted topic.  To make it digestible, I’m breaking it down into multiple blog posts over a series of weeks:

  1. Why do we care about core?
  2. Decomposing the problem (“the spider”)
  3. Insights from decomposition (healthy tensions in OpenStack)
  4. 12 Positions: A Common Framework (I recommend ready the list of 10 instead)
  5. Community Feedback at OSCON 
  6. “What is Core” the visualization
  7. Where I think this is going, OpenStack’s Test Driven Core
  8. Core Positions Refined: the 10 positions behind the core visualization (above).
  9. Videos (most >90 mins).  The online meetups are easier to follow.
    1. 9/5 OpenStack Core Meetup in San Antonio
    2. 9/22 OpenStack Core Meetup in NYC
    3. online: 10/16 Online Meetup (daytime) and 10/22 Online Meetup (evening)
  10. Thinking about how to Implement OpenStack Core Definition

Too much reading?  At OSCON, Rafael Knuth shot a video of me talking about “what is core.”

Crowbar Celebrates 1st Anniversary

Nearly a year ago at OSCON 2011, my team at Dell opened sourced “Crowbar, an OpenStack installer.” That first Github commit was a much more limited project than Crowbar today: there was no separation into barclamps, no distinct network configuration, one operating system option and the default passwords were all “openstack.” We simply did not know if our effort would create any interest.

The response to Crowbar has been exciting and humbling. I most appreciate those who looked at Crowbar and saw more than a bare metal installer. They are the ones who recognized that we are trying to solve a bigger problem: it has been too difficult to cope with change in IT operations.

During this year, we have made many changes. Many have been driven by customer, user and partner feedback while others support Dell product delivery needs. Happily, these inputs are well aligned in intent if not always in timing.

  • Introduction of barclamps as modular components
  • Expansion into multiple applications (most notably OpenStack and Apache Hadoop)
  • Multi-Operating System
  • Working in the open (with public commits)
  • Collaborative License Agreements

Dell‘s understanding of open source and open development has made a similar transformation. Crowbar was originally Apache 2 open sourced because we imagined it becoming part of the OpenStack project. While that ambition has faded, the practical benefits of open collaboration have proven to be substantial.

The results from this first year are compelling:

  • For OpenStack Diablo, coordination with the Rackspace Cloud Builder team enabled Crowbar to include the Keystone and Dashboard projects into Dell’s solution
  • For OpenStack Essex, the community focused work we did for the March Essex Hackday are directly linked to our ability to deliver Dell’s OpenStack-Powered Essex solution over two months earlier than originally planned.
  • For Apache Hadoop distributions for 3.x and 4.x with implementation of Cloudera Manager and eco system components.
  • We’ve amassed hundreds of mail subscribers and Github followers
  • Support for multiple releases of RHEL, Centos & Ubuntu including Ubuntu 12.04 while it was still in beta.
  • SuSE does their own port of Crowbar to SuSE with important advances in Crowbar’s install model (from ISO to package).

We stand on the edge of many exciting transformations for Crowbar’s second year. Based on the amount of change from this year, I’m hesitant to make long term predictions. Yet, just within next few months there are significant plans based on Crowbar 2.0 refactor. We have line of site to changes that expand our tool choices, improve networking, add operating systems and become more even production ops capable.

That’s quite a busy year!

OSCON preso: how Dell Crowbar brings DevOps to OpenStack Cloud (“No Soup for You!”)

Today I presented about how Crowbar + DevOps + OpenStack = CloudOps.   The highlight of the presentation (to me, anyway) is the Images vs Layers analogy of Soup vs Sandwiches.  I hope it helps explain why we believe that a DevOps approach to Cloud is essential to success.

Here’s the preso: OSCON 07 2011

I’ll add a link to the videos when they are available.

OpenStack at OSCON schedule & event signup

If you’re at OSCON, here’s where to find OpenStack content:

OpenStack Wednesday Evening Event (RSVP REQUIRED):

Wednesday, July 27, 7-9 pm, at Spirit of 77 (right across from the Oregon
Convention Center at the close of the day).  Join us to toast the first
anniversary of the fastest-growing open source project! Please register here and
help promote the event: http://openstack-one-year.eventbrite.com

Speaking Sessions, Wednesday, July 27


Introduction to OpenStack, Eric Day

Wednesday, 1:40 pm http://www.oscon.com/oscon2011/public/schedule/detail/19146

Using OpenStack APIs, Present and Future, Mike Mayo
Wednesday, 4:10 pm http://www.oscon.com/oscon2011/public/schedule/detail/18550

OpenStack Fundamentals Training Part 1, Swift, John Dickinson
Wednesday, 4:10 pm http://www.oscon.com/oscon2011/public/schedule/detail/21287

OpenStack Fundamentals Training Part 2, Nova, Jason Cannavale
Wednesday, 5:00 pm http://www.oscon.com/oscon2011/public/schedule/detail/21347

OpenStack One-Year Anniversary Party, Spirit of 77
Wednesday, 7-9 pm http://openstack-one-year.eventbrite.com/

Speaking Sessions, Thursday, July 28

See why Rob says “No Soup for You” about Cloud Deployments.

Prying Open the Cloud with Dell Crowbar and OpenStack, Joseph George, Rob Hirschfeld
Thursday, 10:40 am http://www.oscon.com/oscon2011/public/schedule/detail/21206

OpenStack + Ceph, Ben Cherian, Jonathan Bryce
Thursday, 1:40 pm http://www.oscon.com/oscon2011/public/schedule/detail/21174

Achieving Hybrid Cloud Mobility with OpenStack and XCP, Paul Voccio, Ewan Mellor
Thursday, 2:30 pm http://www.oscon.com/oscon2011/public/schedule/detail/18726

I’ll be at OSCON 7/25-29/11 (Dell=sponsor & speaking w/ @jbgeorge)

As part of our commitment to open source, Dell is a sponsor of OSCON 2011.  The Dell OpenStack Cloud team will have a booth presence with our well-travelled Crowbar Install rack (now with BOTH PowerEdge C6100 & C6105s).  We’re doing our famous 30 minute OpenStack installs and handing out goodies including USB keys. 

Joseph George (@jbgeorge) and I are speaking:

We’ll be giving specifics about how Crowbar works to deliver the Dell OpenStack Cloud Solution including a narrated demo and details about how the community can extend Crowbar using barclamps.

Note:  Stephen Spector (opnstk_com_mgr), the amazing OpenStack community manager, wanted me to remind everyone that we’re celebrating OpenStack’s 1 year anniversary with activites at OSCON.  He’s asking for video commentary about OpenStack and RSVPs if you can attend the events.  More at OpenStack Blog.