SDN’s got Blind Spots! What are these Projects Ignoring? [Guest Post by Scott Jensen]

Scott Jensen returns as a guest poster about SDN!  I’m delighted to share his pointed insights that expand on previous 2 Part serieS about NFV and SDN.  I especially like his Rumsfeldian “unknowable workloads”

In my [Scott’s] last post, I talked about why SDN is important in cloud environments; however, I’d like to challenge the underlying assumption that SDN cures all ops problems.

SDN implementations which I have looked at make the following base assumption about the physical network.  From the OpenContrails documentation:

The role of the physical underlay network is to provide an “IP fabric” – its responsibility is to provide unicast IP connectivity from any physical device (server, storage device, router, or switch) to any other physical device. An ideal underlay network provides uniform low-latency, non-blocking, high-bandwidth connectivity from any point in the network to any other point in the network.

The basic idea is to build an overlay network on top of the physical network in order to utilize a variety of protocols (Netflow, VLAN, VXLAN, MPLS etc.) and build the networking infrastructure which is needed by the applications and more importantly allow the applications to modify this virtual infrastructure to build the constructs that they need to operate correctly.

All well and good; however, what about the Physical Networks?

Under Provisioned / FunnyEarth.comThat is where you will run into bandwidth issues, QOS issues, latency differences and where the rubber really meets the road.  Ignoring the physical networks configuration can (and probably will) cause the entire system to perform poorly.

Does it make sense to just assume that you have uniform low latency connectivity to all points in the network?  In many cases, it does not.  For example:

  • Accesses to storage arrays have a different traffic pattern than a distributed storage system.
  • Compute resources which are used to house VMs which are running web applications are different than those which run database applications.
  • Some applications are specifically sensitive to certain networking issues such as available bandwidth, Jitter, Latency and so forth.
  • Where others will perform actions over the network at certain times of the day but then will not require the network resources for the rest of the day.  Classic examples of this are system backups or replication events.

Over Provisioned / zilya.netIf the infrastructure you are trying to implement is truly unknown as to how it will be utilized then you may have no choice than to over-provision the physical network.  In building a public cloud, the users will run whichever application they wish it may not be possible to engineer the appropriate traffic patterns.

This unknowable workload is exactly what these types of SDN projects are trying to target!

When designing these systems you do have a good idea of how it will be utilized or at least how specific portions of the system will be utilized and you need to account for that when building up the physical network under the SDN.

It is my belief that SDN applications should not just create an overlay.  That is part of the story, but should also take into account the physical infrastructure and assist with modifying the configuration of the Physical devices.  This balance achieves the best use of the network for both the applications which are running in the environment AND for the systems which they run on or rely upon for their operations.

Correctly ProvisionedWe need to reframe our thinking about SDN because we cannot just keep assuming that the speeds of the network will follow Moore’s Law and that you can assume that the Network is an unlimited resource.

One thought on “SDN’s got Blind Spots! What are these Projects Ignoring? [Guest Post by Scott Jensen]

  1. Pingback: Technology Short Take #44 - blog.scottlowe.org - The weblog of an IT pro specializing in virtualization, networking, cloud, servers, & Macs

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