Cloud Culture Series TL;DR? Generation Cloud Cheat sheet [Collaborative Series 2/8]

SUBTITLE: Your series is TOO LONG, I DID NOT READ It!

This post is #2 in an collaborative eight part series by Brad Szollose and I about how culture shapes technology.

Your attention is valuable to us! In this section, you will find the contents of this entire blog series distilled down into a flow chart and one-page table.  Our plan is to release one post each Wednesday at 1 pm ET.

Graphical table of contents

flow chartThe following flow chart is provided for readers who are looking to maximize the efficiency of their reading experience.

If you are unfamiliar with flow charts, simply enter at the top left oval. Diamonds are questions for you to choose between answers on the departing arrows. The curved bottom boxes are posts in the series.

Here’s the complete list: 1: Intro > 2: ToC > 3: Video Reality > 4: Authority > 5: On The Game Training > 6: Win by Failing > 7: Go Digital Native > 8: Three Takeaways

Culture conflict table (the Red versus Blue game map)

Our fundamental challenge is that the cultures of Digital Immigrants and Natives are diametrically opposed.  The Culture Conflict Table, below, maps out the key concepts that we explore in depth during this blog series.

Digital Immigrants (N00Bs) Digital Natives (L33Ts)
Foundation: Each culture has different expectations in partners
  Obey RulesThey want us to prove we are worthy to achieve “trusted advisor” status.

They are seeking partners who fit within their existing business practices.

Test BoundariesThey want us to prove that we are innovative and flexible.

They are seeking partners who bring new ideas that improve their business.

  1. Organizational Hierarchy see No Spacesuits (Post 4)
  Permission DrivenOrganizational Hierarchy is efficient

Feel important talking high in the org

Higher ranks can make commitments

Bosses make decisions (slowly)

Peer-to-Peer DrivenOrganizational Hierarchy is limiting

Feel productive talking lower in the org

Lower ranks are more collaborative

Teams make decisions (quickly)

  1. Communication Patterns see MMOG as Job Training (Post 5)
  Formalized & StructuredWaits for Permission

Bounded & Linear

Requirements Focused

Questions are interruptions

Casual & InterruptingDoes NOT KNOW they need permission

Open Ended

Discovered & Listening

Questions show engagement

  1. Risks and Rewards see Level Up (Post 6)
  Obeys RulesAvoid Risk—mistakes get you fired!

Wait and see

Fear of “looking foolish”

Breaks RulesEmbrace Risk—mistakes speed learning

Iterate to succeed

Risks get you “in the game”

  1. Building your Expertise see Becoming L33T (Post 7)
Knowledge is Concentrated Expertise is hard to get (Diploma)

Keeps secrets (keys to success)

Quantitate—you can measure it

Knowledge is Distributed and SharedExpertise is easy to get (Google)

Likes sharing to earn respect

Qualitative—trusts intuition

Hopefully, this condensed version got you thinking.  In the next post, we start to break this information down.

Keep Reading! Next post is Video Reality

6 thoughts on “Cloud Culture Series TL;DR? Generation Cloud Cheat sheet [Collaborative Series 2/8]

  1. One of the things I’ve been thinking about for a few years (with different terminology) is that Digital Natives have a fault tolerate network that enables them to perform better. They use multi-path routing to get around bad nodes in their personal and corporate network (hierarchy). If someone in the organization blocks them or blocks the team from performing, they will route around that person, generally ignoring hierarchy. Dead nodes quickly lose their value in the organization.

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  2. Pingback: Cloud Culture: New IT leaders are transforming the way we create and purchase technology. [Collaborative Series 1/8] | Rob Hirschfeld

  3. Pingback: Cloud Culture: Reality has become a video game [Collaborative Series 3/8] | Rob Hirschfeld

  4. Pingback: Three critical ingredients for digital age relationships. [Collaborate Series 8/8] | Rob Hirschfeld

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