You need a Squid Proxy fabric! Getting Ready State Best Practices

Sometimes a solving a small problem well makes a huge impact for operators.  Talking to operators, it appears that automated configuration of Squid does exactly that.

Not a SQUID but...

If you were installing OpenStack or Hadoop, you would not find “setup a squid proxy fabric to optimize your package downloads” in the install guide.   That’s simply out of scope for those guides; however, it’s essential operational guidance.  That’s what I mean by open operations and creating a platform for sharing best practice.

Deploying a base operating system (e.g.: Centos) on a lot of nodes creates bit-tons of identical internet traffic.  By default, each node will attempt to reach internet mirrors for packages.  If you multiply that by even 10 nodes, that’s a lot of traffic and a significant performance impact if you’re connection is limited.

For OpenCrowbar developers, the external package resolution means that each dev/test cycle with a node boot (which is up to 10+ times a day) is bottle necked.  For qa and install, the problem is even worse!

Our solution was 1) to embed Squid proxies into the configured environments and the 2) automatically configure nodes to use the proxies.   By making this behavior default, we improve the overall performance of a deployment.   This further improves the overall network topology of the operating environment while adding improved control of traffic.

This is a great example of how Crowbar uses existing operational tool chains (Chef configures Squid) in best practice ways to solve operations problems.  The magic is not in the tool or the configuration, it’s that we’ve included it in our out-of-the-box default orchestrations.

It’s time to stop fumbling around in the operational dark.  We need to compose our tool chains in an automated way!  This is how we advance operational best practice for ready state infrastructure.

2 thoughts on “You need a Squid Proxy fabric! Getting Ready State Best Practices

  1. Pingback: OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (June 27 – July 4) » The OpenStack Blog

  2. Pingback: OpenCrowbar 2.B to deliver multiple hardware vendor support and advanced integrations | Rob Hirschfeld

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