5 Key Aspects of High Fidelity DevOps [repost from DevOps.com]

For all our cloud enthusiasm, I feel like ops automation is suffering as we increase choice and complexity.  Why is this happening?  It’s about loss of fidelity.

Nearly a year ago, I was inspired by a mention of “Fidelity Gaps” during a Cloud Foundry After Dark session.  With additional advice from DevOps leader Gene Kim, this narrative about the why and how of DevOps Fidelity emerged.

As much as we talk about how we should have shared goals spanning Dev and Ops, it’s not nearly as easy as it sounds. To fuel a DevOps culture, we have to build robust tooling, also.

That means investing up front in five key areas: abstraction, composability, automation, orchestration, and idempotency.

Together, these concepts allow sharing work at every level of the pipeline. Unfortunately, it’s tempting to optimize work at one level and miss the true system bottlenecks.

Creating production-like fidelity for developers is essential: We need it for scale, security and upgrades. It’s not just about sharing effort; it’s about empathy and collaboration.

But even with growing acceptance of DevOps as a cultural movement, I believe deployment disparities are a big unsolved problem. When developers have vastly different working environments from operators, it creates a “fidelity gap” that makes it difficult for the teams to collaborate.

Before we talk about the costs and solutions, let me first share a story from back when I was a bright-eyed OpenStack enthusiast…

Read the Full Article on DevOps.com including my section about Why OpenStack Devstack harms the project and five specific ways to improve DevOps fidelity.

3 thoughts on “5 Key Aspects of High Fidelity DevOps [repost from DevOps.com]

  1. Pingback: yes, we are papering over Container ops [from @TheNewStack #DockerCon] | Rob Hirschfeld

  2. Pingback: Why we can’t move past installers to talk about operations – the underlay gap | Rob Hirschfeld

  3. Pingback: Apparently IT death smells like kickstart files. Six Reasons why. | Rob Hirschfeld

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