Let’s DevOps IRL: my SRE postings on RackN!

I’m investing in these Site Reliability Engineering (SRE) discussions because I believe operations (and by extension DevOps) is facing a significant challenge in keeping up with development tooling.   The links below have been getting a lot of interest on twitter and driving some good discussion.

datanauts_logo_300

15967

Addressing this Ops debt is our primary mission at my company, RackN: we believe that integrated system level tooling is required.  We also believe that new tools should not disrupt environments so we work very hard to adapt to requirements of individual sites.

SRE is urgent because it provides a pragmatic path and rationale for investment.

Even if you don’t agree with Google’s term or all their practices, I think fundamental concepts of system thinking, status/pay, automation investment and developer collaboration are essential.  It should come as no surprise that these are all Lean/DevOps concepts; however, SRE has the pragmatic side of being a job function.

Here are some recent relevant discussions I’ve been having about SREs with links to both the audio and my text show notes.

Of course, RackN is also doing a WEEKLY SRE update that captures general interest items.  Check that out and subscribe.

What does it take to Operate Open Platforms? Answers in Datanaughts 72

Did I just let OpenStack ops off the hook….?  Kubernetes production challenges…?  

ix34grhy_400x400I had a lot of fun in this Datanaughts wide ranging discussion with unicorn herders Chris Wahl and Ethan Banks.  I like the three section format because it gives us a chance to deep dive into distinct topics and includes some out-of-band analysis by the hosts; however, that means you need to keep listening through the commercial breaks to hear the full podcast.

Three parts?  Yes, Chris and Ethan like to save the best questions for last.

In Part 1, we went deep into the industry operational and business challenges uncovered by the OpenStack project. Particularly, Chris and I go into “platform underlay” issues which I laid out in my “please stop the turtles” post. This was part of the build-up to my SRE series.

In Part 2, we explore my operations-focused view of the latest developments in container schedulers with a focus on Kubernetes. Part of the operational discussion goes into architecture “conceits” (or compromises) that allow developers to get the most from cloud native design patterns. I also make a pitch for using proven tools to run the underlay.

In Part 3, we go deep into DevOps automation topics of configuration and orchestration. We talk about the design principles that help drive “day 2” automation and why getting in-place upgrades should be an industry priority.  Of course, we do cover some Digital Rebar design too.

Take a listen and let me know what you think!

On Twitter, we’ve already started a discussion about how much developers should care about infrastructure. My opinion (posted here) is that one DevOps idea where developers “own” infrastructure caused a partial rebellion towards containers.

SRE role with DevOps for Enterprise [@HPE podcast]

sre-series

My focus on SRE series continues… At RackN, we see a coming infrastructure explosion in both complexity and scale. Unless our industry radically rethinks operational processes, current backlogs will escalate and stability, security and sharing will suffer.

Yes, DevOps and SRE are complementary

In this short 16 minute podcast, HPE’s Stephen Spector and I discuss how DevOps and SRE thinking overlaps and where are the differences.  We also discuss how Enterprises should be evaluating Site Reliability Engineering as a function and where it fits in their organization.

“Why SRE?” Discussion with Eric @Discoposse Wright

sre-series My focus on SRE series continues… At RackN, we see a coming infrastructure explosion in both complexity and scale. Unless our industry radically rethinks operational processes, current backlogs will escalate and stability, security and sharing will suffer.

ericewrightI was a guest on Eric “@discoposse” Wright of the Green Circle Community #42 Podcast (my previous appearance).

LISTEN NOW: Podcast #42 (transcript)

In this action-packed 30 minute conversation, we discuss the industry forces putting pressure on operations teams.  These pressures require operators to be investing much more heavily on reusable automation.

That leads us towards why Kubernetes is interesting and what went wrong with OpenStack (I actually use the phrase “dumpster fire”).  We ultimately talk about how those lessons embedded in Digital Rebar architecture.

yes, we are papering over Container ops [from @TheNewStack #DockerCon]

thenewstackIn this brief 7 minute interview made at DockerCon 16, Alex Williams and I cover a lot of ground ranging from operations’ challenges in container deployment to the early seeds of the community frustration with Docker 1.12 embedding swarm.

I think there’s a lot of pieces we’re still wishing away that aren’t really gone. (at 4:50)

Rather than repeat TheNewStack summary; I want to highlight the operational and integration gaps that we continue to ignore.

It’s exciting to watch a cluster magically appear during a keynote demo, but those demos necessarily skip pass the very real provisioning, networking and security work needed to build sustained clusters.

These underlay problems are general challenges that we can address in composable, open and automated ways.  That’s the RackN goal with Digital Rebar and we’ll be showcasing how that works with some new Kubernetes automation shortly.

Here is the interview on SoundCloud or youtube:

 

Open Source as Reality TV and Burning Data Centers [gcOnDemand podcast notes]

During the OpenStack summit, Eric Wright (@discoposse) and I talked about a wide range of topics from scoring success of OpenStack early goals to burning down traditional data centers.

Why burn down your data center (and move to public cloud)? Because your ops process are too hard to change. Rob talks about how hybrid provides a path if we can made ops more composable.

Here are my notes from the audio podcast (source):

1:30 Why “zehicle” as a handle? Portmanteau from electrics cars… zero + vehicle

Let’s talk about OpenStack & Cloud…

  • OpenStack History
    • 2:15 Rob’s OpenStack history from Dell and Hyperscale
    • 3:20 Early thoughts of a Cloud API that could be reused
    • 3:40 The practical danger of Vendor lock-in
    • 4:30 How we implemented “no main corporate owner” by choice
  • About the Open in OpenStack
    • 5:20 Rob decomposes what “open” means because there are multiple meanings
    • 6:10 Price of having all open tools for “always open” choice and process
    • 7:10 Observation that OpenStack values having open over delivering product
    • 8:15 Community is great but a trade off. We prioritize it over implementation.
  • Q: 9:10 What if we started later? Would Docker make an impact?
    • Part of challenge for OpenStack was teaching vendors & corporate consumers “how to open source”
  • Q: 10:40 Did we accomplish what we wanted from the first summit?
    • Mixed results – some things we exceeded (like growing community) while some are behind (product adoption & interoperability).
  • 13:30 Interop, Refstack and Defcore Challenges. Rob is disappointed on interop based on implementations.
  • Q: 15:00 Who completes with OpenStack?
    • There are real alternatives. APIs do not matter as much as we thought.
    • 15:50 OpenStack vendor support is powerful
  • Q: 16:20 What makes OpenStack successful?
    • Big tent confuses the ecosystem & push the goal posts out
    • “Big community” is not a good definition of success for the project.
  • 18:10 Reality TV of open source – people like watching train wrecks
  • 18:45 Hybrid is the reality for IT users
  • 20:10 We have a need to define core and focus on composability. Rob has been focused on the link between hybrid and composability.
  • 22:10 Rob’s preference is that OpenStack would be smaller. Big tent is really ecosystem projects and we want that ecosystem to be multi-cloud.

Now, about RackN, bare metal, Crowbar and Digital Rebar….

  • 23:30 (re)Intro
  • 24:30 VC market is not metal friendly even though everything runs on metal!
  • 25:00 Lack of consistency translates into lack of shared ops
  • 25:30 Crowbar was an MVP – the key is to understand what we learned from it
  • 26:00 Digital Rebar started with composability and focus on operations
  • 27:00 What is hybrid now? Not just private to public.
  • 30:00 How do we make infrastructure not matter? Multi-dimensional hybrid.
  • 31:00 Digital Rebar is orchestration for composable infrastructure.
  • Q: 31:40 Do people get it?
    • Yes. Automation is moving to hybrid devops – “ops is ops” and it should not matter if it’s cloud or metal.
  • 32:15 “I don’t want to burn down my data center” – can you bring cloud ops to my private data center?

Hybrid & Container Disruption [Notes from CTP Mike Kavis’ Interview]

Last week, Cloud Technology Partner VP Mike Kavis (aka MadGreek65) and I talked for 30 minutes about current trends in Hybrid Infrastructure and Containers.

leadership-photos-mike

Mike Kavis

Three of the top questions that we discussed were:

  1. Why Composability is required for deployment?  [5:45]
  2. Is Configuration Management dead? [10:15]
  3. How can containers be more secure than VMs? [23:30]

Here’s the audio matching the time stamps in my notes:

  • 00:44: What is RackN? – scale data center operations automation
  • 01:45: Digital Rebar is… 3rd generation provisioning to manage data center ops & bring up
  • 02:30: Customers were struggling on Ops more than code or hardware
  • 04:00: Rethinking “open” to include user choice of infrastructure, not just if the code is open source.
  • 05:00: Use platforms where it’s right for users.
  • 05:45: Composability – it’s how do we deal with complexity. Hybrid DevOps
  • 06:40: How do we may Ops more portable
  • 07:00: Five components of Hybrid DevOps
  • 07:27: Rob has “Rick Perry” Moment…
  • 08:30: 80/20 Rule for DevOps where 20% is mixed.
  • 10:15: “Is configuration management dead” > Docker does hurt Configuration Management
  • 11:00: How Service Registry can replace Configuration.
  • 11:40: Reference to John Willis on the importance of sequence.
  • 12:30: Importance of Sequence, Services & Configuration working together
  • 12:50: Digital Rebar intermixes all three
  • 13:30: The race to have orchestration – “it’s always been there”
  • 14:30: Rightscale Report > Enterprises average SIX platforms in use
  • 15:30: Fidelity Gap – Why everyone will hybrid but need to avoid monoliths
  • 16:50: Avoid hybrid trap and keep a level of abstraction
  • 17:41: You have to pay some “abstraction tax” if you want to hybrid BUT you can get some additional benefits: hybrid + ops management.
  • 18:00: Rob gives a shout out to Rightscale
  • 19:20: Rushing to solutions does not create secure and sustained delivery
  • 20:40: If you work in a silo, you loose the ability to collaborate and reuse other works
  • 21:05: Rob is sad about “OpenStack explosion of installers”
  • 21:45: Container benefit from services containers – how they can be MORE SECURE
  • 23:00: Automation required for security
  • 23:30: How containers will be more secure than containers
  • 24:30: Rob bring up “cheese” again…
  • 26:15: If you have more situationalleadership-photos-mike awareness, you can be more secure WITHOUT putting more work for developers.
  • 27:00: Containers can help developers worry about as many aspects of Ops
  • 27:45: Wrap up

What do you think?  I’d love to hear your opinion on these topics!