Hey Dockercon, let’s get Physical!

IMG_20170419_121918Overall, Dockercon did a good job connecting Docker users with information.  In some ways, it was a very “let’s get down to business” conference without the open source collaboration feel of previous events.  For enterprise customers and partners, that may be a welcome change.

Unlike past Dockercons, the event did not have major announcements or a lot of non-Docker ecosystem buzz.  That said, I miss that the event did not have major announcements or a lot of non-Docker ecosystem buzz.

One item that got me excited was an immutable operating system called LinuxKit which is powered by a Packer-like utility called Moby (ok, I know it does more but that’s still fuzzy to me).

RackN CTO, Greg Althaus, was able to turn around a working LinuxKit Kubernetes demo (VIDEO) overnight.  This short video explains Moby & LinuxKit plus uses the new Digital Rebar Provision in an amazing integration.

Want to hear more about immutable operating systems?  Check out our post on RackN’s site about three challenges of running things like LinuxKit, CoreOS Container Linux and RancherOS on metal.

Oh, and YES, that was my 15-year-old daughter giving a presentation at Dockercon about workplace diversity.  I’ll link the video when they’ve posted them.

https://www.slideshare.net/KateHirschfeld/slideshelf

Cloudcast.net gem about Cluster Ops Gap

15967Podcast juxtaposition can be magical.  In this case, I heard back-to-back sessions with pragmatic for cluster operations and then how developers are rebelling against infrastructure.

Last week, I was listening to Brian Gracely’s “Automatic DevOps” discussion with  John Troyer (CEO at TechReckoning, a community for IT pros) followed by his confusingly titled “operators” talk with Brandon Phillips (CTO at CoreOS).

John’s mid-recording comments really resonated with me:

At 16 minutes: “IT is going to be the master of many environments… If you have an environment is hybrid & multi-cloud, then you still need to care about infrastructure… we are going to be living with that for at least 10 years.”

At 18 minutes: “We need a layer that is cloud-like, devops-like and agile-like that can still be deployed in multiple places.  This middle layer, Cluster Ops, is really important because it’s the layer between the infrastructure and the app.”

The conversation with Brandon felt very different where the goal was to package everything “operator” into Kubernetes semantics including Kubernetes running itself.  This inception approach to running the cluster is irresistible within the community because the goal of the community is to stop having to worry about infrastructure.  [Brian – call me if you want to a do podcast of the counter point to self-hosted].

Infrastructure is hard and complex.  There’s good reason to limit how many people have to deal with that, but someone still has to deal with it.

I’m a big fan of container workloads generally and Kubernetes specifically as a way to help isolate application developers from infrastructure; consequently, it’s not designed to handle the messy infrastructure requirements that make Cluster Ops a challenge.  This is a good thing because complexity explodes when platforms expose infrastructure details.

For Kubernetes and similar, I believe that injecting too much infrastructure mess undermines the simplicity of the platform.

There’s a different type of platform needed for infrastructure aware cluster operations where automation needs to address complexity via composability.  That’s what RackN is building with open Digital Rebar: a the hybrid management layer that can consistently automate around infrastructure variation.

If you want to work with us to create system focused, infrastructure agnostic automation then take a look at the work we’ve been doing on underlay and cluster operations.

 

As Docker rises above (and disrupts) clouds, I’m thinking about their community landscape

Watching the lovefest of DockerConf last week had me digging up my April 2014 “Can’t Contain(erize) the Hype” post.  There’s no doubt that Docker (and containers more broadly) is delivering on it’s promise.  I was impressed with the container community navigating towards an open platform in RunC and vendor adoption of the trusted container platforms.

I’m a fan of containers and their potential; yet, remotely watching the scope and exuberance of Docker partnerships seems out of proportion with the current capabilities of the technology.

The latest update to the Docker technology, v1.7, introduces a lot of important network, security and storage features.  The price of all that progress is disruption to ongoing work and integration to the ecosystem.

There’s always two sides to the rapid innovation coin: “Sweet, new features!  Meh, breaking changes to absorb.”

Docker Ecosystem Explained

Docker Ecosystem Explained

There remains a confusion between Docker the company and Docker the technology.  I like how the chart (right) maps out potential areas in the Docker ecosystem.  There’s clearly a lot of places for companies to monetize the technology; however, it’s not as clear if the company will be able to secede lucrative regions, like orchestration, to become a competitive landscape.

While Docker has clearly delivered a lot of value in just a year, they have a fair share of challenges ahead.  

If OpenStack is a leading indicator, we can expect to see vendor battlegrounds forming around networking and storage.  Docker (the company) has a chance to show leadership and build community here yet could cause harm by giving up the arbitrator role be a contender instead.

One thing that would help control the inevitable border skirmishes will be clear definitions of core, ecosystem and adjacencies.  I see Docker blurring these lines with some of their tools around orchestration, networking and storage.  I believe that was part of their now-suspended kerfuffle with CoreOS.

Thinking a step further, parts of the Docker technology (RunC) have moved over to Linux Foundation governance.  I wonder if the community will drive additional shared components into open governance.  Looking at Node.js, there’s clear precedent and I wonder if Joyent’s big Docker plans have them thinking along these lines.