Exploring the Edge Series: “Edge is NOT just Mini-Cloud”

While the RackN team and I have been heads down radically simplifying physical data center automation, I’ve still been tracking some key cloud infrastructure areas.  One of the more interesting ones to me is Edge Infrastructure.

This once obscure topic has come front and center based on coming computing stress from home video, retail machine and distributed IoT.  It’s clear that these are not solved from centralized data centers.

While I’m posting primarily on the RackN.com blog, I like to take time to bring critical items back to my personal blog as a collection.  WARNIING: Some of these statements run counter to other industry.  Please let me know what you think!

Don’t want to read?  Here’s a summary podcast.

Post 1: OpenStack On Edge? 4 Ways Edge Is Distinct From Cloud

By far the largest issue of the Edge discussion was actually agreeing about what “edge” meant.  It seemed as if every session had a 50% mandatory overhead in definitioning.  Putting my usual operations spin on the problem, I choose to define edge infrastructure in data center management terms.  Edge infrastructure has very distinct challenges compared to hyperscale data centers.  Read article for the list...

Post 2: Edge Infrastructure Is Not Just Thousands Of Mini Clouds

Running each site as a mini-cloud is clearly not the right answer.  There are multiple challenges here. First, any scale infrastructure problem must be solved at the physical layer first. Second, we must have tooling that brings repeatable, automation processes to that layer. It’s not sufficient to have deep control of a single site: we must be able to reliably distribute automation over thousands of sites with limited operational support and bandwidth. These requirements are outside the scope of cloud focused tools.

Post 3: Go CI/CD And Immutable Infrastructure For Edge Computing Management

If “cloudification” is not the solution then where should we look for management patterns?  We believe that software development CI/CD and immutable infrastructure patterns are well suited to edge infrastructure use cases.  We discussed this at a session at the OpenStack OpenDev Edge summit.

What do YOU think?  This is an evolving topic and it’s time to engage in a healthy discussion.

Hey Dockercon, let’s get Physical!

IMG_20170419_121918Overall, Dockercon did a good job connecting Docker users with information.  In some ways, it was a very “let’s get down to business” conference without the open source collaboration feel of previous events.  For enterprise customers and partners, that may be a welcome change.

Unlike past Dockercons, the event did not have major announcements or a lot of non-Docker ecosystem buzz.  That said, I miss that the event did not have major announcements or a lot of non-Docker ecosystem buzz.

One item that got me excited was an immutable operating system called LinuxKit which is powered by a Packer-like utility called Moby (ok, I know it does more but that’s still fuzzy to me).

RackN CTO, Greg Althaus, was able to turn around a working LinuxKit Kubernetes demo (VIDEO) overnight.  This short video explains Moby & LinuxKit plus uses the new Digital Rebar Provision in an amazing integration.

Want to hear more about immutable operating systems?  Check out our post on RackN’s site about three challenges of running things like LinuxKit, CoreOS Container Linux and RancherOS on metal.

Oh, and YES, that was my 15-year-old daughter giving a presentation at Dockercon about workplace diversity.  I’ll link the video when they’ve posted them.

https://www.slideshare.net/KateHirschfeld/slideshelf

How scared do we need to be for Ops collaboration & investment?

Note: Yesterday RackN posted Are you impatient enough to be an SRE?  and then the CIA wikileaks news hit… perhaps the right question is “Are you scared enough to automate deeply yet?” 

Cia leak (1)As an industry, the CIA hacking release yesterday should be driving discussions about how to make our IT infrastructure more robust and fluid. It is not simply enough to harden because both the attack and the platforms are evolving to quickly.

We must be delivering solutions with continuous delivery and immutability assumptions baked in.

A more fluid IT that assumes constant updates and rebuilding from sources (immutable) is not just a security posture but a proven business benefit. For me, that means actually building from the hardware up where we patch and scrub systems regularly to shorten the half-life of all attach surfaces. It also means enabling existing security built into our systems that are generally ignored because of configuration complexity. These are hard but solvable automation challenges.

The problem is too big to fix individually: we need to collaborate in the open.

I’ve been really thinking deeply about how we accelerate SRE and DevOps collaboration across organizations and in open communities. The lack of common infrastructure foundations costs companies significant overhead and speed as teams across the globe reimplement automation in divergent ways. It also drags down software platforms that must adapt to each data center as a unique snowflake.

That’s why hybrid automation within AND between companies is an imperative. It enables collaboration.

Making automation portable able to handle the differences between infrastructure and environments is harder; however, it also enables sharing and reuse that creates allows us to improve collectively instead of individually.

That’s been a vision driving us at RackN with the open hybrid Digital Rebar project.  Curious?  Here’s RackN post that inspired this one:

From RackN’s Are you impatient enough to be an SRE?

“Like the hardware that runs it, the foundation automation layer must be commoditized. That means that Operators should be able to buy infrastructure (physical and cloud) from any vendor and run it in a consistent way.  Instead of days or weeks to get infrastructure running, it should take hours and be fully automated from power-on.  We should be able to rehearse on cloud and transfer that automation directly to (and from) physical without modification.  That practice and pace should be the norm instead of the exception.”