(re)OpenStack for 2017 – board voting week starts this Monday

[1/19 Update: I placed 9th in the results (or 6th if you go only by popular vote instead of total votes).  There are 8 seats, so I was not elected.]

The OpenStack Project needs a course correction and I’m asking for your community vote to put me back on the 2017 Board to help drive it.  As a start-up CEO, I’m neutral, yet I also have the right technical, commercial and community influence to make this a reality.

Vote Now!Your support is critical because OpenStack fills a very real need and should have a solid future; however, it needs to adapt to market realities to achieve that.

I want the Board to acknowledge and adapt to stumbles in ecosystem success including being dropped or re-prioritized by key sponsors.  This should include tightening the mission so the project can collaborate more freely with both open and proprietary platforms.  In 2016, I’ve been deeply involved OpenStack alternatives including Kubernetes and hybrid Cloud automation with Amazon and Google.

OpenStack must adjust to being one of several alternatives including AWS, Google and container platforms like Kubernetes.

That means focusing on our IaaS strengths and being unambiguous about core function like SDN and storage integration.   It also means ensuring that commercial members of the ecosystem can both profit and compete.  The Board has both the responsibility and authority to make these changes if the members are willing to act.

What’s my background?  I’ve been an active and vocal member of the OpenStack community since the very beginning of the project especially around Operator and Product Management issues.  I was elected to the board four times and played critical roles including launching the DefCore efforts and pushing for more definition of the Big Tent concept (which I believe has hurt the project).

In a great field of candidates!  Like other years, there are many very strong candidates whom I have worked with in a number of roles.  I always recommend distributing your eight votes to multiple people and limited “affinity voting” for your own company or geography.   While all candidates would serve the board, this year, I’d like to call attention specifically to  Shamail Tahair as a candidate who has invested significant time in helping with Product Management and Enterprise Readiness for OpenStack.

@NextCast chat about DefCore, Metal Ops and OpenStack evolution

In Vancouver, I sat down with Scott Sanchez (EMC) and Jeff Dickey (Redapt) for a NextCast discussion.   We covered a lot of my favorite subjects including DefCore and Ready State bare metal operations.

One of the things I liked about this discussion was that we were able to pull together the seemly disparate threads that I’m work on around OpenStack.

OpenStack DefCore Community Review – TWO Sessions April 21 (agenda)

During the DefCore process, we’ve had regular community check points to review and discuss the latest materials from the committee.  With the latest work on the official process and flurry of Guidelines, we’ve got a lot of concrete material to show.

To accommodate global participants, we’ll have TWO sessions (and record both):

  1. April 21 8 am Central (1 pm UTC) https://join.me/874-029-687 
  2. April 21 8 pm Central (9 am Hong Kong) https://join.me/903-179-768 

Eye on OpenStackConsult the call etherpad for call in details and other material.

Planned Agenda:

  • Background on DefCore – very short 10 minutes
    • short description
    • why board process- where community
  •  Interop AND Trademark – why it’s both – 5 minutes
  •  Vendors AND Community – balancing the needs – 5 minutes
  •  Mechanics
    • testing & capabilities – 5 minutes
    • self testing & certification – 5 minutes
    • platform & components & trademark – 5 minutes
  • Quick overview of the the Process (to help w/ reviewers) – 15 minutes
  • How to get involved (Gerrit) – 5 minute

OpenStack DefCore Accelerates & Simplifies with Clear and Timely Guidelines [Feedback?]

Last week, the OpenStack DefCore committee rolled up our collective sleeves and got to work in a serious way.  We had a in-person meeting with great turn out
with 5 board members, Foundation executives/staff and good community engagement.

defcore timelineTL;DR > We think DefCore deliverables should be dated milestone guidelines instead tightly coupled to release events (see graphic).

DefCore has a single goal expressed from two sides: 1) defining the “what is OpenStack” brand for Vendors and 2) driving interoperability between OpenStack installations.  From that perspective, it is not about releases, but about testable stable capabilities.  Over time, these changes should be incremental and, most importantly, trail behind new features that are added.

For those reasons, it was becoming confusing for DefCore to focus on an “Icehouse” definition when most of the capabilities listed are “Havana” ones.  We also created significant time pressure to get the “Kilo DefCore” out quickly after the release even though there were no “Kilo” specific additions covered.

In the face-to-face, we settled on a more incremental approach.  DefCore would regularly post a set of guidelines for approval by the Board.  These Guidelines would include the required, deprecated (leaving) and advisory (coming) capabilities required for Vendors to use the mark (see footnote*).  As part of defining capabilities, we would update which capabilities were included in each component and  which components were required for the OpenStack Platform.  They would also include the relevant designated sections.  These Guidelines would use the open draft and discussion process that we are in the process of outlining for approval in Vancouver.

Since DefCore Guidelines are simple time based lists of capabilities, the vendors and community can simply reference an approved Guideline using the date of approval (for example DefCore 2015.03) and know exactly what was included.  While each Guideline stands alone, it is easy to compare them for incremental changes.

We’ve been getting positive feedback about this change; however, we are still discussing it and appreciate your input and questions.  It is very important for us to make DefCore simple and easy.  For that, your confused looks and WTF? comments are very helpful.

* footnote: the Foundation manages the OpenStack brand and the process includes multiple facets.  The DefCore Guidelines are just one part of the brand process.

OpenStack PSA: Individual members we need more help – Please Vote!

1/17 Update: We did it!  We reached quorum and approved all the changes!  Also, I am honored to have been re-elected to the Board.  Thank you for the support.

I saw the latest report and we’ve still got a LONG WAY TO GO to get to the quorum that we need.  Don’t let your co-worker or co-contributor be the one missing vote!

Note: If you thing you should have gotten a ballot email but did not.  Contact the OpenStack Election Secretary for assistance.  OpenStack voting is via YOUR PERSONALIZED EMAIL only – you cannot use someone else’s ballot.

Here’s the official request that we’ve been forwarding in the community

OpenStack Individual Members we need your help – Please Vote!

Untitled drawingIncluded on the upcoming individual elections ballot is set of proposed bylaw changes [note: I am also seeking re-election]. To be enacted, these changes require approval by the individual members. At least 25% of the Individual Members must participate in this election in order for the vote to take effect which is why we are reaching out to you. The election will start Monday January 12, 2015 and run thru Friday January 16, 2015.

The unprecedented growth, community size and active nature of the OpenStack community have precipitated the need for OpenStack Bylaw updates. The updates will enable our community to adapt to our continued rapid growth, change and diversity, while reflecting our success and market leadership. Although the proposed changes only effect a small set of verbiage in the bylaws, the changes eliminate some of the hard coded values and naive initial assumptions that found their way into the bylaws when they were initially created in 2013. Those initial assumptions did not anticipate that by 2015 we would have such a large, active community of over 17,000 individual members, over 430 corporate members, and a large diverse set of OpenStack based products and services.

Through many months of community iterative discussion and debate, the DefCore team and board have unanimously accepted a set of changes that are now placed before you for your approval. The changes replace the original hard coded “core” definition with a process for determining the software elements required for use of the OpenStack commercial trademark. Processes which will also account for future revisions and determinations for Core and Trademark Policy.

Note: Another change sets the quorum level at a more reasonable 10%, so these PSAs should not be required in the future.

Complete details on the proposed changes are located at:
https://wiki.openstack.org/wiki/Governance/Foundation/2014ProposedBylawsAmendment

Complete details on the 2015 Board Election are located at:
http://www.openstack.org/election/2015-individual-director-election/

Voting time for OpenStack! Your help needed to push Bylaws & DefCore forward.

1/17 Update: We did it!  We reached quorum and approved all the changes!  Also, I am honored to have been re-elected to the Board.  Thank you for the support!

What does OpenStack mean to you?

Vote Now!To me, it’s more than infrastructure software: it’s a community of people and companies working together in revolutionary way.  To make that work, we need people who invest time to bring together diverse interests and perspectives.

I have worked hard to provide neutral and inclusive view points on the OpenStack board.  The critical initiatives I focused on [DefCore, Gold Membership, Product Managers] need focused leadership to progress.  I have proven my commitment to those efforts and would be honored to be re-elected [see my platforms for 2012, 2013 & 2014].

But more important than voting for me, is that we reach a 25% quorum!

Why?  Because there are critical changes to the OpenStack bylaws on the ballot.

What type of changes?  Basically, the changes allow OpenStack governance to keep up with the pace of our evolution.    These are pragmatic changes that have been thoroughly discussed in the community.  They enable OpenStack to:

  • set a smarter quorum – past elections only achieved half the required turn out to changes the bylaws
  • enable the DefCore process – current core is defined as simply using code in select projects.
  • improve governance of required committees
  • tweak release language to match current practice,

To hit 25%, we need everyone, not just the typical evangelists to encourage voting.  We need you to help spread the word and get others to do the same.

I’m counting on you, please help. 

Tweaking DefCore to subdivide OpenStack platform

The following material will be a major part of the discussion for The OpenStack Board meeting on Monday 10/20.  Comments and suggest welcome!

OpenStack in PartsAuthor’s 2/26/2015 Note:  This proposal was approved by the Board in October 2014.

For nearly two years, the OpenStack Board has been moving towards creating a common platform definition that can help drive interoperability.  At the last meeting, the Board paused to further review one of the core tenants of the DefCore process (Item #3: Core definition can be applied equally to all usage models).

Outside of my role as DefCore chair, I see the OpenStack community asking itself an existential question: “are we one platform or a suite of projects?”  I’m having trouble believing “we are both” is an acceptable answer.

During the post-meeting review, Mark Collier drafted a Foundation supported recommendation that basically creates an additional core tier without changing the fundamental capabilities & designated code concepts.  This proposal has been reviewed by the DefCore committee (but not formally approved in a meeting).

The original DefCore proposed capabilities set becomes the “platform” level while capability subsets are called “components.”  We are considering two initial components, Compute & Object, and both are included in the platform (see illustration below).  The approach leaves the door open for new core component to exist both under and outside of the platform umbrella.

In the proposal, OpenStack vendors who meet either component or platform requirements can qualify for the “OpenStack Powered” logo; however, vendors using the only a component (instead of the full platform) will have more restrictive marks and limitations about how they can use the term OpenStack.

This approach addresses the “is Swift required?” question.  For platform, Swift capabilities will be required; however, vendors will be able to implement the Compute component without Swift and implement the Object component without Nova/Glance/Cinder.

It’s important to note that there is only one yard stick for components or the platform: the capabilities groups and designed code defined by the DefCore process.  From that perspective, OpenStack is one consistent thing.  This change allows vendors to choose sub-components if that serves their business objectives.

It’s up to the community to prove the platform value of all those sub-components working together.