OpenStack Essex Deploy Day 3/8 – Get involved and install with us

My team at Dell has been avidly tracking the upsdowns, and breakthroughs of the OpenStack Essex release.  While we still have a few milestones before the release is cut, we felt like the E4 release was a good time to begin the work on Essex deployment.  Of course, the final deployment scripts will need substantial baking time after the final release on April 5th; however, getting deployments working will help influence the quality efforts and expand the base of possible testers.

To rally behind Essex Deployments, we are hosting a public work day on Thursday March 8th.

For this work day, we’ll be hosting all-day community events online and physically in Austin and Boston.  We are getting commitments from other Dell teams, partners and customers around the world to collaborate.  The day is promising to deliver some real Essex excitement.

The purpose of these events is to deliver the core of a working OpenStack Essex deployment.  While my team is primarily focused on deploys via Crowbar/Chef, we are encouraging anyone interested in laying down OpenStack Essex to participate.  We will be actively engaged on the OpenStack IRC and mailing lists too.

We have experts in OpenStack, Chef, Crowbar and Operating Systems (Canonical, SUSE, and RHEL) engaged in these activities.

This is a great time to start learning about OpenStack (or Crowbar) with hands-on work.  We are investing substantial upfront time (checkout out the Crowbar wiki for details) to ensure that there is a working base OpenStack Essex deploy on Ubuntu 12.04 beta.  This deploy includes the Crowbar 1.3 beta with some new features specifically designed to make testing faster and easier than ever before.

In the next few days, I’ll cut a 12.04 ISO and OpenStack Barclamp TARs as the basis for the deploy day event.  I’ll also be creating videos that help you quickly get a test lab up and running.  Visit the wiki or meetup sites to register and stay tuned for details!

Crowbar+OpenStack Insights for the week: Food Fight Podcast & Boston Meetup 2/1

Please don’t confuse a lack of posts with a lack of activity!  I’ve been in the center of a whirlwind of Crowbar, OpenStack and Hadoop for my team at Dell.  I’ve also working on an interesting side project with Liquid Leadership author (and would-be star ship captain) Brad Szollose.

I just don’t have time to post all of the awesomeness.  I can tell you that my team is very focused on Hadoop (RHEL 6.2/CentOS 6.2 + open Cloudera Distro) barclamps as we get some Diablo deployments done.  Also the Crowbar list has been very active about Diablo.  If you’re looking for advanced information, there is  some inside scoop on the Crowbar FoodFight podcast I did with Bryan Berry & Matt Ray.

I’ll be in BOSTON THIS WEDNESDAY 2/1 for the OpenStack Meetup there.  We’re going to be talking about Quantum and the OpenStack Foundation.  I suspect that Keystone will come up too (but that’s the subject of another post).  Of course, it’s not just your humble blogger: the whole Dell CloudEdge OpenStack/Crowbar team will be on hand!  So put on your cloud geek hat and take a trip to Harvard for the meetup!

Extending Chef’s reach: “Managed Nodes” for External Entities.

Note: this post is very technical and relates to detailed Chef design patterns used by Crowbar. I apologize in advance for the post’s opacity. Just unleash your inner DevOps geek and read on. I promise you’ll find some gems.

At the Opscode Community Summit, Dell’s primary focus was creating an “External Entity” or “Managed Node” model. Matt Ray prefers the term “managed node” so I’ll defer to that name for now. This model is needed for Crowbar to manage system components that cannot run an agent such as a network switch, blade chassis, IP power distribution unit (PDU), and a SAN array. The concept for a managed node is that there is an instance of the chef-client agent that can act as a delegate for the external entity. We’ve been reluctant to call it a “proxy” because that term is so overloaded.

My Crowbar vision is to manage an end-to-end cloud application life-cycle. This starts from power and network connections to hardware RAID and BIOS then up to the services that are installed on the node and ultimately reaches up to applications installed in VMs on those nodes.

Our design goal is that you can control a managed node with the same Chef semantics that we already use. For example, adding a Network proposal role to the Switch managed node will force the agent to update its configuration during the next chef-client run. During the run, the managed node will see that the network proposal has several VLANs configured in its attributes. The node will then update the actual switch entity to match the attributes.

Design Considerations

There are five key aspects of our managed node design. They are configuration, discovery, location, relationships, and sequence. Let’s explore each in detail.

A managed node’s configuration is different than a service or actuator pattern. The core concept of a node in chef is that the node owns the configuration. You make changes to the nodes configuration and it’s the nodes job to manage its state to maintain that configuration. In a service pattern, the consumer manages specific requests directly. At the summit (with apologies to Bill Clinton), I described Chef configuration as telling a node what it “is” while a service provide verbs that change a node. The critical difference is that a node is expected to maintain configuration as its composition changes (e.g.: node is now connected for VLAN 666) while a service responds to specific change requests (node adds tag for VLAN 666). Our goal is the maintain Chef’s configuration management concept for the external entities.

Managed nodes also have a resource discovery concept that must align with the current ohai discovery model. Like a regular node, the manage node’s data attributes reflect the state of the managed entity; consequently we’d expect a blade chassis managed node to enumerate the blades that are included. This creates an expectation that the manage node appears to be “root” for the entity that it represents. We are also assuming that the Chef server can be trusted with the sharable discovered data. There may be cases where these assumptions do not have to be true, but we are making them for now.

Another essential element of managed nodes is that their agent location matters because the external resource generally has restricted access. There are several examples of this requirement. Switch configuration may require a serial connection from a specific node. Blade SANs and PDUs management ports are restricted to specific networks. This means that the manage node agents must run from a specific location. This location is not important to the Chef server or the nodes’ actions against the managed node; however, it’s critical for the system when starting the managed node agent. While it’s possible for managed nodes to run on nodes that are outside the overall Chef infrastructure, our use cases make it more likely that they will run as independent processes from regular nodes. This means that we’ll have to add some relationship information for managed nodes and perhaps a barclamp to install and manage managed nodes.

All of our use cases for managed nodes have a direct physical linkage between the managed node and server nodes. For a switch, it’s the ports connected. For a chassis, it’s the blades installed. For a SAN, it’s the LUNs exposed. These links imply a hierarchical graph that is not currently modeled in Chef data – in fact, it’s completely missing and difficult to maintain. At this time, it’s not clear how we or Opscode will address this. My current expectation is that we’ll use yet more roles to capture the relationships and add some hierarchical UI elements into Crowbar to help visualize it. We’ll also need to comprehend node types because “managed nodes” are too generic in our UI context.

Finally, we have to consider the sequence of action for actions between managed nodes and nodes.  In all of our uses cases, steps to bring up a node requires orchestration with the managed node.  Specifically, there needs to be a hand-off between the managed node and the node.  For example, installing an application that uses VLANs does not work until the switch has created the VLAN,  There are the same challenges on LUNs and SAN and blades and chassis.  Crowbar provides orchestration that we can leverage assuming we can declare the linkages.

For now, a hack to get started…

For now, we’ve started on a workable hack for managed nodes. This involves running multiple chef-clients on the admin server in their own paths & processes. We’ll also have to add yet more roles to comprehend the relationships between the managed nodes and the things that are connected to them. Watch the crowbar listserv for details!

Extra Credit

Notes on the Opscode wiki from the Crowbar & Managed Node sessions

Opscode Summit Recap – taking Chef & DevOps to a whole new level

Opscode Summit Agenda created by open space

I have to say that last week’s Opscode Community Summit was one of the most productive summits that I have attended. Their use of the open-space meeting format proved to be highly effective for a team of motivated people to self-organize and talk about critical topics. I especially like the agenda negations (see picture for an agenda snapshot) because everyone worked to adjust session times and locations based on what else other sessions being offered. Of course, is also helped to have an unbelievable level of Chef expertise on tap.

Overall

Overall, I found the summit to be a very valuable two days; consequently, I feel some need to pay it forward with some a good summary. Part of the goal was for the community to document their sessions on the event wiki (which I have done).

The roadmap sessions were of particular interest to me. In short, Chef is converging the code bases of their three products (hosted, private and open). The primary change on this will moving from CouchBD to a SQL based DB and moving away the API calls away from Merb/Ruby to Erlang. They are also improving search so that we can make more fine-tuned requests that perform better and return less extraneous data.

I had a lot of great conversations. Some of the companies represented included: Monster, Oracle, HP, DTO, Opscode (of course), InfoChimps, Reactor8, and Rackspace. There were many others – overall >100 people attended!

Crowbar & Chef

Greg Althaus and I attended for Dell with a Crowbar specific agenda so my notes reflect the fact that I spent 80% of my time on sessions related to features we need and explaining what we have done with Chef.

Observations related to Crowbar’s use of Chef

  1. There is a class of “orchestration” products that have similar objectives as Crowbar. Ones that I remember are Cluster Chef, Run Deck, Domino
  2. Crowbar uses Chef in a way that is different than users who have a single application to deploy. We use roles and databags to store configuration that other users inject into their recipes. This is dues to the fact that we are trying to create generic recipes that can be applied to many installations.
  3. Our heavy use of roles enables something of a cookbook service pattern. We found that this was confusing to many chef users who rely on the UI and knife. It works for us because all of these interactions are automated by Crowbar.
  4. We picked up some smart security ideas that we’ll incorporate into future versions.

Managed Nodes / External Entities

Our primary focus was creating an “External Entity” or “Managed Node” model. Matt Ray prefers the term “managed node” so I’ll defer to that name for now. This model is needed for Crowbar to manage system components that cannot run an agent such as a network switch, blade chassis, IP power distribution unit (PDU), and a SAN array. The concept for a managed node is that that there is an instance of the chef-client agent that can act as a delegate for the external entity. I had so much to say about that part of the session, I’m posting it as its own topic shortly.

Dell Crowbar Project: Open Source Cloud Deployer expands into the Community

Note: Cross posted on Dell Tech Center Blogs.

Background: Crowbar is an open source cloud deployment framework originally developed by Dell to support our OpenStack and Hadoop powered solutions.  Recently, it’s scope has increased to include a DevOps operations model and other deployments for additional cloud applications.

It’s only been a matter of months since we open sourced the Dell Crowbar Project at OSCON in June 2011; however, the progress and response to the project has been over whelming.  Crowbar is transforming into a community tool that is hardware, operating system, and application agnostic.  With that in mind, it’s time for me to provide a recap of Crowbar for those just learning about the project.

Crowbar started out simply as an installer for the “Dell OpenStack™-Powered Cloud Solution” with the objective of deploying a cloud from unboxed servers to a completely functioning system in under four hours.  That meant doing all the BIOS, RAID, Operations services (DNS, NTP, DHCP, etc.), networking, O/S installs and system configuration required creating a complete cloud infrastructure.  It was a big job, but one that we’d been piecing together on earlier cloud installation projects.  A key part of the project involved collaborating with Opscode Chef Server on the many system configuration tasks.  Ultimately, we met and exceeded the target with a complete OpenStack install in less than two hours.

In the process of delivering Crowbar as an installer, we realized that Chef, and tools like it, were part of a larger cloud movement known as DevOps.

The DevOps approach to deployment builds up systems in a layered model rather than using packaged images.  This layered model means that parts of the system are relatively independent and highly flexible.  Users can choose which components of the system they want to deploy and where to place those components.  For example, Crowbar deploys Nagios by default, but users can disable that component in favor of their own monitoring system.  It also allows for new components to identify that Nagios is available and automatically register themselves as clients and setup application specific profiles.  In this way, Crowbar’s use of a DevOps layered deployment model provides flexibility for BOTH modularized and integrated cloud deployments.

We believe that operations that embrace layered deployments are essential for success because they allow our customers to respond to the accelerating pace of change.  We call this model for cloud data centers “CloudOps.”

Based on the flexibility of Crowbar, our team decided to use it as the deployment model for our Apache™ Hadoop™ project (“Dell | Apache Hadoop Solution”).  While a good fit, adding Hadoop required expanding Crowbar in several critical ways.

  1. We had to make major changes in our installation and build processes to accommodate multi-operating system support (RHEL 5.6 and Ubuntu 10.10 as of Oct 2011).
  2. We introduced a modularization concept that we call “barclamps” that package individual layers of the deployment infrastructure.  These barclamps reach from the lowest system levels (IPMI, BIOS, and RAID) to the highest (OpenStack and Hadoop).

Barclamps are a very significant architecture pattern for Crowbar:

  1. They allow other applications to plug into the framework and leverage other barclamps in the solution.  For example, VMware created a Cloud Foundry barclamp and Dream Host has created a Ceph barclamp.  Both barclamps are examples of applications that can leverage Crowbar for a repeatable and predictable cloud deployment.
  2. They are independent modules with their own life cycle.  Each one has its own code repository and can be imported into a live system after initial deployment.  This allows customers to expand and manage their system after initial deployment.
  3. They have many components such as Chef Cookbooks, custom UI for configuration, dependency graphs, and even localization support.
  4. They offer services that other barclamps can consume.  The Network barclamp delivers many essential services for bootstrapping clouds including IP allocation, NIC teaming, and node VLAN configuration.
  5. They can provide extensible logic to evaluate a system and make deployment recommendations.  So far, no barclamps have implemented more than the most basic proposals; however, they have the potential for much richer analysis.

Making these changes was a substantial investment by Dell, but it greatly expands the community’s ability to participate in Crowbar development.  We believe these changes were essential to our team’s core values of open and collaborative development.

Most recently, our team moved Crowbar development into the open.  This change was reflected in our work on OpenStack Diablo (+ Keystone and Dashboard) with contributions by Opscode and Rackspace Cloud Builders.  Rather than work internally and push updates at milestones, we are now coding directly from the Crowbar repositories on Github.  It is important to note that for licensing reasons, Dell has not open sourced the optional BIOS and RAID barclamps.  This level of openness better positions us to collaborate with the crowbar community.

For a young project, we’re very proud of the progress that we’ve made with Crowbar.  We are starting a new chapter that brings new challenges such as expanding community involvement, roadmap transparency, and growing Dell support capabilities.  You will also begin to see optional barclamps that interact with proprietary and licensed hardware and software.  All of these changes are part of growing Crowbar in framework that can support a vibrant and rich ecosystem.

We are doing everything we can to make it easy to become part of the Crowbar community.  Please join our mailing list, download the open source code or ISO, create a barclamp, and make your voice heard.  Since Dell is funding the core development on this project, contacting your Dell salesperson and telling them how much you appreciate our efforts goes a long way too.

WHIR Webinar Notes: Prying Open the Cloud with Dell Crowbar & OpenStack

Panelists: Me (@zehicle) & Joseph B. George (@jbgeorge), Director, Cloud and Big Data Solutions, Dell

Moderator: Liam Eagle (@theWHIR) , Editor-in-Chief, Web Host Industry Review

Wow, this Webinar was an hour of OpenStack insights (see the whole thing). If you don’t have the hour then you can use my time line nodes to jump to what you want to hear.

  • 2:50: Presentation Starts (introductions are over)
  • 3:40: Joseph coins the word “dynormous” for dynamic & large scale clouds
  • 4:40: Customers want to know how they are going to maintain a cloud
  • 4:50: Customers don’t want a 9 month cycle for features, want it faster. DevOps gives us the flexibility to meet our customer needs as quickly as they want to.
  • 7:11: Massive scalability… their (Rackspace & NASA) business is about scale
  • 8:00: Rackspace and NASA started from the beginning to build a community
  • 8:50: We have the data that this has staying power
  • 10:10: We see a lot of companies joining in the community
  • 11:56: Shout out to Opscode Chef
  • 12:40: From bare metal to a fully functioning cloud in under 2 hours. Crowbar allows you to introduce new elements into the environment
  • 13:40: Crowbar leverages our experience with cloud deployments
  • 14:33: Dell was the only provider there from day 1. We have the most experience.
  • 17:27: DevOps Poll
  • 18:40: DevOps is a significant trend that you should consider. Hosters have a lot of operational chops.
  • 19:34: There are a lot of right ways to do cloud. You need to pick what’s best for your business model
  • 20:23: We could get hardware and software, but operational expertise was missing.
  • 21:33: We’re more making the complexity of a cloud go away. We are getting our customers a head start. We are chipping away at the learning curve.
  • 22:05: The cloud is always ready, never finished. Cloud is an ongoing operational environment: DevOps!
  • 23:30: Crowbar bakes a lot of operational experience into the deployment.
  • 25:17: Core tenant of DevOps: there is no single OpenStack image. Cloud is too complex. We build it in layers.
  • 26:26: Before you deploy, you can change the configuration.
  • 27:30: Barclamps are modules that execute a function. We are inviting community participation
  • 28:40: Crowbar process view – Crowbar is a “PXE state machine” is a very simplified description.
  • 29:57: You can go through a tuning cycle where you can get it working, make sure it’s right, flush and reset. That ensures you have an automated system.
  • 30:34: Screen shots with descriptions
  • 33:25: Event the core state machine that runs Crowbar is deployed as a barclamp
  • 35:00: You can download OpenStack and install it yourself from our github. We don’t want to talk about OpenStack, we want to DO OpenStack.
  • Poll Results (see to the right)
  • 38:00: Online resources
  • 40:00: Question 1: Timeline for RHEL. Answer: RHEL is part of Hadoop, will make it into OpenStack by end of year (or sooner based on market demand)
  • 42:17: Question 2: What led Dell to get involved in OpenStack? Answer: It’s about experience. We like being able to fix and change if we needed. There is a lot of active community
  • 45:30: Question 3: How does a hardware maker play with open source software? Answer: It’s a solution for us. We wanted to make sure that people cloud deploy the software. Adding DevOps takes it to another level.
  • 48:00 Question 4: What elements of Diablo are most exciting? Answer: Keystone (centralized authentication) is a big deal. Networking changes that “bust the top” of the networking hurdles.
  • 50:25: Question 5: Where is OpenStack going long term? Answer: We’re pleasantly surprised about how much it’s picked up. We’ll see more standards in the community. We have high hopes for OpenStack and have invested heavily. We’ll see more as-a-service capabilities to build on a common infrastructure: both open and commercial.
  • 52:47: Question 6: What’s the biggest barrier to operating at scale? Answer: learning how to operate is the biggest hurdle. We took a learning approach to help customers get started. We are hosting a training with Rackspace.
  • 55:00: Question 7: Where does Dell and Rackspace overlap? Answer: We see Rackspace Cloud Builders that the premier experts. Dell Services is involved with all of it. Dell takes the phone call and deals with our customers directly.

Video of Crowbar Install & Introduction (two 15 min videos)

These Crowbar videos are the first two in a series of how to setup and use your own local Crowbar dev environment (here’s more info & the ISO).   I used VMware Workstation, but any virtual hosts that support Ubuntu 10.10 will work fine.  We use ESX, KVM and Xen for testing too.

Creating this environment is the basis for learning Crowbar, experimenting with OpenStack and creating your own barclamps.  It’s also a handy way to play with Opscode Chef since it includes a stand alone Chef server.

Some items from the install video that I want to re-emphasize:

  • The admin server REQUIRES >1 GB of RAM (more is better)
  • All other nodes REQUIRE > 512 MB of RAM (more depending on what you install)
  • At least TWO NICS are required.
  • You must disable DHCP on the virtual network because Crowbar has a DHCP server and they will conflict.
  • The login for the Crowbar admin server is openstack/openstack.  You must “sudo -i” before you run the install script.
  • The default url for Crowbar is http://192.168.124.10:3000  (crowbar/crowbar)

Installing Crowbar (15 mins)

Introduction to Crowbar (15 mins)

9/30 Bonus Video: How to change the default networking

Continue reading

Crowbar source released, includes OpenStack Cloud install

I’m delighted to announce (official version) that my team at Dell has opened the Crowbar source under the Apache 2 license. This action is part of the broader Dell OpenStack Cloud Solution which includes OpenStack install packages, Crowbar, reference hardware architectures, and services/consulting to support deployments.

There are two important components to this news:

  1. Dell is officially offering our OpenStack Solution and helping advance the community’s ability to implement OpenStack quickly and consistently.
  2. Dell is releasing the Crowbar code (which is included in the solution) as open source.

Both are significant items; however, my focus here is on the Crowbar release.

Crowbar started as a Dell OpenStack installer project and then grew beyond that in scope.  Now it can be extended to work with other vendors’ kits and other solutions bits.

We are contributing Crowbar to the community because we believe that everyone benefits by sharing in the operational practices that Crowbar embodies. These are rooted in Opscsode Chef (which Crowbar tightly integrates with) and the cloud & hyper-scale proven DevOps practices that are reflected in our deployment model.

Where to get it?

What’s included?

  • A comprehensive set of barclamps to set up an OpenStack cloud.
  • Crowbar UI and Remote APIs to make it easy to set up your cloud
  • Automated testing scripts for community members doing continuous integration with OpenStack.
  • Build scripts so you can create your own Crowbar install ISO
  • Switch discovery so you can create Chef Cookbooks that are network aware.
  • Open source Chef server that powers much of Crowar’s functionality

What’s not included?

  • Non-open source license components (BIOS+RAID config) that we could not distribute under the Apache 2 license.  We are working to address this and include them in our release.  They are available in the Dell Licensed version of Crowbar.
  • Dell Branded Components (skin + overview page).   Crowbar has an OpenSource skin with identical functionality.
  • Pre-built ISOs with install images (you must download the open source components yourself, we cannot redistribute them to you as a package)

Important notes:

  • Crowbar uses Chef Server as its database and relies on cookbooks for node deployments.  It is installed (using Chef Solo) automatically as part of the Crowbar install.
  • Crowbar has a modular architecture so individual components can be removed, extended, and added. These components are known individually as barclamps.
  • Each barclamp has its own Chef configuration, UI sub-component, deployment configuration, and documentation.

On the project roadmap:

  • Hadoop support
  • Additional operating system support (specifically RHEL)
  • Barclamp version repository
  • Network configuration
  • We’d like suggestions!  Please comment!

Sites for more information: Joseph George, Barton George (launch day), Dell

Crowbar modules (aka barclamps) perform many functions and enable multi-vendor hardware

10/18 Update:

More recent information about Barclamps can be found at https://robhirschfeld.com/2011/09/14/details-of-crowbar-changes/.  We’ve also created videos showing how you can create your own barclamps.

Original Post

Just after we’d started deep Crowbar development, Andi Abes, Paul Webster and Victor Lowther joined the Dell Crowbar+OpenStack team.  They immediately started to dig into our Swift, BIOS/RAID, and Network components.  They also started to bump into each other in our original code base.  It quickly became apparent that we needed to modularize Crowbar.

Restructuring Crowbar into modules has proved essential as a method for safe community collaboration.

Greg Althaus coined the name “barclamps” during the modularization rearchitecture.  A barclamp is a class extension of the Crowbar ServiceObject that allows Crowbar to identify the Chef components used by the barclam

p (name p

attern in Chef is bc-template-[barclamp]) and provides capabilities that are specific to each barclamp.

  • In the simplest case, the barclamp is a minimal wrapper that just provides naming hooks for your Chef cookbooks.  This makes it very easily to adapt existing Chef work to work with Crowbar.
  • In more complex cases, the barclamp will help identity how nodes are allocated, interacts with other barclamps, extends the provisioner state machine and provides custom user interfaces.
  • In most cases, the barclamp’s generic integration and UI are sufficient.
Initially, barclamps were entirely exposed via REST using the ServiceObject.  We quickly wrapped those into a CLI for our continuous integration system.  Lately, we’ve expressed them in the user interface.
At launch, you’ll find all but two in the open source repository.  Unfortunately, we were not able to include BIOS and RAID barclamps in the open version because they use licensed components – we are working to correct this.  They are available in the Dell licensed version.
When looking at the barclamps, it is critical to understand that even the most core Crowbar functionality is expressed as a barclamp.
This exposure of Crowbar internals as barclamps is important because it
  1. helps modularize the code and
  2. reflects the deep integration between Chef and Crowbar.

Consequently, the core logic of the state machine, networking configuration, and provisioning are all exposed in barclamps.  This makes it possible to modify and extend the most basic Crowbar operations; however, there are currently no guards against breaking these barclamps either!

The following list includes all the barclamps that we’ve created for Crowbar.
Barclamp   Function  Included
Crowbar The roles and recipes to set up the barclamp framework.  Yes
Deployer Initial classification system for the Crowbar environment (aka the state machine)  Yes
Provisioner The roles and recipes to set up the provisioning server and a base environment for all nodes  Yes
Network Instantiates network interfaces on the crowbar managed systems. Also manages the address pool.  Yes
NTP Common NTP service for the cluster. An NTP server or servers can be specified and all other nodes will be clients of them.  Yes
DNS manages the DNS subsystem for the cluste  Yes
Logging centralized logging system based on syslog  Yes
IPMI Integrates with IP management to allow direct hardware control bypassing the operating system.  Yes
RAID LSI Licensed components.  Cannot be included in open source release at this time.  No
BIOS
PowerEdge C series: Dell License component.  Cannot be included in open source release at this time.  No
Ganglia Optional: a common Ganglia service for the cluster that can be used by other barclamps  Yes
Nagios Optional : common monitoring service for the cluster that can be used by other barclamps  Yes
Nova OpenStack: installs and configures the Openstack Nova (Cactus Release) component. It relies upon the network and glance barclamps for normal operation.  Yes
Swift OpenStack: part of Openstack (Cactus Release) , and provides a distributed blob storage  Yes
Glance OpenStack: Glance service (Cactus Release, Nova image management) for the cloud  Yes
Test provides a shell for writing tests against  Yes